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Greg Osby: Saxophone “Griot”

Victor L. Schermer By

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The griot is a West African historian, storyteller, praise singer, poet and/or musician, a repository of oral tradition who is often seen as a societal leader. Saxophonist Greg Osby recently was excited to meet some griots on his travels. While he is originally from St. Louis, he himself is a griot in many senses of the word. As Peter Margasak said in Jazz Times as early as 2000, "Greg Osby has quietly become one of the most potent, complete and important saxophonists in jazz." That reputation continues to this day, and he has become a force in all aspects of the jazz scene, exploring possibilities and genres, mentoring younger musicians, and jump starting a successful record company, Inner Circle Music.

Beginning with the formation of the M-Base Collective with Steve Coleman in the 1980s, Osby has been helping musicians come together to develop new approaches and to advance their cause. He is a perennial seeker of knowledge, not only about music, but about diverse subjects from restoring collectors' items to spiritual teachings. He uses his knowledge to push the envelope of jazz. In those respects, he is a griot par excellence, and in this interview he candidly discusses his musical development with astute observations and strong views on what he and the music are all about.

All About Jazz: A couple of warm-up questions. First, the desert island question: please give us a few recordings that you would take to that desert island.

Greg Osby: Off the top of my head, maybe Charles Mingus' Mingus Ah Um (Columbia, 1959). Duke Ellington, Indigos (Columbia, 1958). Thelonious Monk, Underground (Columbia, 1968). Shirley Horn, Here's to Life (Verve, 1992. Betty Carter, The Audience (Verve, 1980). I could go on forever, actually...

AAJ: Any classical music that you especially like?

GO: I do love Erik Satie, Debussy, Ravel, Ibert. Also Alexander Scriabin. I enjoy the progressions and motives that are utilized in French-infused classical music.

AAJ: If you were in a big city, and there was a lot of jazz going on, who are some of the musicians and groups you'd grab a chance to hear?

GO: To be honest, I would be more inclined towards towards catching the younger players. They best represent the idea of music being put together from the large numbers of historical building blocks that we have available to us now. Some of my current favorites are Logan Richardson, Godwin Lewis, Jaleel Shaw on alto saxophone, Ambrose Akinmusire, Adam O'Farrill on trumpet, Walter Smith III, Melissa Aldana, Ben Wendel, Tivon Pennicott, Troy Roberts on tenor sax, Aaron Parks, Christian Li, Victor Gould, Matt Mitchell, Gerald Clayton, John Chin on piano, Matt Brewer, Linda May Han Oh, Ben Williams on bass, Lage Lund, Mike Moreno on guitar, Sara Serpa, Gretchen Parlato on vocals, Eric Harland, Jonathan Blake, Tommy Crane, Marcus Gilmore on drums, younger people like that. Far too many to mention, really. I applaud their fearlessness and their ability to channel their influences into an identifiable platform -music that is representative of our times. There are others who promote and practice traditional values, which is also great, but for my own personal preference, I like to hear music that is a representation and expression of the world as an artist experiences it—while it's happening.

Early Roots

AAJ: Let's go back to your youth. You grew up in St. Louis, a city that plays an important role in the history of jazz. What was your life there like as a kid, and especially the musical influences?

GO: I enjoyed typical inner city radio-oriented listening, with healthy dosages of James Brown, Wilson Pickett, and Otis Redding, Ike and Tina Turner. Lots of soul music, funk and R&B. In the sixth grade, I was able to get my hands on a clarinet when there was an opening in the junior high school band. I chose the clarinet over the trombone, and I took to it quite rapidly. I learned the fingerings, how to develop a tone, how to play little melodies on it in a very short time. And I couldn't get enough of it.

AAJ: Did you have a teacher at that time?

GO: My clarinet teacher was actually a trumpeter by the name of Fred Irby III, who is now (and has been for the past 42 years) the director of the Jazz Ensemble and Coordinator of Instrumental Music at Howard University in Washington, DC. He was working on his music education graduate degree back then and made his rounds on the public school circuit, doing student teaching. He was very inspiring. But outside of that, I've never really had any formal instrumental music lessons in my entire life. I may have had some great advice and personal coaching, but no regular or legitimate lessons as such. It's interesting to hear myself say that because I've never really thought about it very much until now.

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Sonic Halo

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2014

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2008

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