All About Jazz

Home » Search Center » Results: John Coltrane

Results for "John Coltrane"

Advanced search options

MUSICIAN Born:

John Coltrane

John William Coltrane was born on September 23, 1926 in Hamlet, North Carolina. At the age of three his family moved to High Point, NC, where young Coltrane spent his early years. His father, John Robert Coltrane, died in 1939, leaving twelve year-old John and his mother on their own. His mother, Alice Blair Coltrane, moved to New Jersey to work as a domestic while John completed high school. John played first the clarinet, then alto saxophone in his high school band. His first musical influence was the tenor saxophonist Lester Young of Count Basie's band. In June of 1943, after graduation, Coltrane moved to Philadelphia to be closer to his mother. After a yearlong stint in the Navy (1945-46), Coltrane began playing gigs in and around Philadelphia

Giant Steps: Remastered & Super Deluxe Editions

Label: Rhino
Released: 2020
Track listing: Disc One: Giant Steps; Cousin Mary; Countdown; Spiral; Syeeda’s Flute Song; Naima; Mr P.C.

Disc Two: Giant Steps (Take 1); Naima (Alternate); Like Sonny (Alternate); Countdown (Alternate); Syeeda’s Flute Song (Alternate); Cousin Mary (Alternate); Giant Steps (Take 5); Giant Steps (Take 6).

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

Rez Abbasi: On balancing picture with music and shifting into Django mode

Read "Rez Abbasi: On balancing picture with music and shifting into Django mode" reviewed by Friedrich Kunzmann

To really distinguish oneself in today's vast universe of guitarists, even within the confines of jazz, more and more resembles a Sisyphus task. When so much has been said and done, a specific tone or distinctive vocabulary alone no longer suffice to set an artist apart from the crowd. It is only through the sum of ...

ARTICLE: PROFILE

20 Seattle Jazz Musicians You Should Know: Rick Mandyck

Read "20 Seattle Jazz Musicians You Should Know: Rick Mandyck" reviewed by Paul Rauch

The city of Seattle has a jazz history that dates back to the very beginnings of the form. It was home to the first integrated club scene in America on Jackson St in the 1920's and 1930's. It saw a young Ray Charles arrive as a teenager to escape the nightmare of Jim Crow in the ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

The Word from Johannesburg, Part I: Nduduzo Makhathini

Read "The Word from Johannesburg, Part I: Nduduzo Makhathini" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

In 1919, the Pasadena Evening Post said: “the friends of Mr. Whiteman have with much enthusiasm bestowed the title of “King of Jazz" upon him." While Paul Whiteman was heavily criticized for wearing the crown, it was not one that was self-attributed or with which he felt completely comfortable. But Whiteman was a brilliant marketer and ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Hard Bop Still Cookin’ - Terell Stafford, The Cookers, Aaron Diehl, Chano Dominguez, Poncho Sanchez

Read "Hard Bop Still Cookin’ - Terell Stafford, The Cookers, Aaron Diehl, Chano Dominguez, Poncho Sanchez" reviewed by Russell Perry

Since the 1950s, there have consistently been players who found in Hard Bop a comfortable place to return to, even as the focus of the music ebbed and flowed. Perhaps, this is because so many heroes of modern jazz created the music that defined the genre, players like Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Freddie Hubbard, Wayne Shorter, ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Rah! Rah!: Claire Daly's Tribute to Rahsaan Roland Kirk and Other New Releases

Read "Rah! Rah!: Claire Daly's Tribute to Rahsaan Roland Kirk and Other New Releases" reviewed by Mary Foster Conklin

A bounty of new releases this week from saxophonist Claire Daly, harmonicist Hermine Deurloo, Thelonious Monk (newly discovered live performance), the Mike Melito Dino Losito Quartet, plus vocalists Simone Kopmajer, Sandra Marlowe and Sarah Moule, along with birthday shoutouts to Norma Winstone, Rebecca Kilgore, Lara Driscoll, Isabel Crespo, Leonard Cohen, John Coltrane and more. Thanks for ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Big September Birthdays & More

Read "Big September Birthdays & More" reviewed by Marc Cohn

We celebrate big September birthdays this week on G&M: Ray Charles, Muhal Richard Abrams and Sonny Rollins @ 90; Gary Bartz, Hamiet Bluiet, Dave Burrell and Roy Ayers @ 80! Of course, we have more: Horace Silver, Wilbur Ware, Elvin Jones, Sam Rivers, Cannonball Adderley and John Coltrane. So many of the greats and near-greats celebrate ...

ARTICLE: MEET THE STAFF

Meet La-Faithia White

Read "Meet La-Faithia White" reviewed by La-Faithia White

I currently live in: I currently live in High Point, North Carolina. High Point is famously the childhood home of jazz saxophonist John Coltrane, and more recently of American Idol winner Fantasia Barrino.I joined All About Jazz in: 2018.Why did you decide to contribute to All About Jazz? I began shooting jazz ...

ARTICLE: PROFILE

Azar Lawrence Has Paid His Dues...Two times

Read "Azar Lawrence Has Paid His Dues...Two times" reviewed by Chuck Koton

Tenor and soprano saxophonist Azar Lawrence has been one of the most dynamic and spiritually-charged reed players of the post-John Coltrane generation. Lawrence forged his sound in the fires of the Elvin Jones and McCoy Tyner bands in the 1970s and, for nearly five decades, he has performed and recorded with the best musicians in the ...


ENGAGE

Enter our contest giveaways

Contest Giveaways

Win a chance at the VMP Anthology: The Story of Herbie Hancock (8 albums / 11 LPs)! One click entry.

Contest Guidelines

Reader's Poll: Which cities worldwide are tops in presenting jazz? Let us know.

Top Jazz Cities Poll

Which cities worldwide are tops in presenting jazz? Let us know—select up to ten.

More Polls

Publisher's Desk

Blast from our past... AAJMe: a short but sweet run. Read on.

MORE POSTS

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.