Home » Search Center » Results: Henry Threadgill

Results for "Henry Threadgill"

Advanced search options

Results for pages tagged "Henry Threadgill"...

Musician

Henry Threadgill

Born:

Henry Threadgill first performed as a percussionist in his high school marching band before taking up the baritone saxophone and later a large portion of the woodwind instrument family. He soon settled primarily upon the alto saxophone and the flute. He was one of the original members of the legendary AACM (Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians) in his hometown of Chicago and worked under the guidance of Muhal Richard Abrams before leaving to tour with a gospel band. He later served in the Army, where he played with a rock band. Upon his return to Chicago he rejoined fellow AACM members Fred Hopkins and Steve McCall, forming a trio which would eventually become the group Air, one of the most celebrated and critically acclaimed avant-garde jazz groups of the 1970s and 1980s

5

Article: Album Review

John Yao: Off-Kilter

Read "Off-Kilter" reviewed by Mark Corroto


In all great ensemble recordings one pays no attention to the compositions and arrangements. The music just seems to dance without inhibitions and flow over the ears. Correction: excellent ensemble performances compel one to recognize and appreciate the compositions and arrangements. With composer, arranger, trombonist John Yao both statements are true and both are in opposition ...

6

Article: Building a Jazz Library

Henry Threadgill: 9 Plus Essential Albums

Read "Henry Threadgill: 9 Plus Essential Albums" reviewed by Steve Cook


More people should listen to the music of Henry Threadgill. Without any actual statistics at hand, it's safe to say that one could consider his market to be niche. Yes, many jazz fans know him as a long-established creative force. He even won a Pulitzer. But he probably does not ring a bell among the many ...

16

Article: Album Review

Wadada Leo Smith: The Emerald Duets

Read "The Emerald Duets" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


The pioneering British photographer/author Val Wilmer said of Wadada Leo Smith, “he no longer relates to the restrictions of scales and chords. To him, music is about two things only: sound and rhythm." Her assessment, from the essential book As Serious As Your Life (Allison & Busby Ltd, 1977), was published in 1977. But in the ...

6

Article: Album Review

Myra Melford: For The Love Of Fire And Water

Read "For The Love Of Fire And Water" reviewed by John Sharpe


Inspired by artist Cy Twombly, pianist Myra Melford has produced a superb album which combines notated signposts with unbridled exchanges. She's helped by an all star agglomeration comprising some of New York's most accoplished instrumentalists: guitarist Mary Halvorson, saxophonist Ingrid Laubrock, cellist Tomeka Reid and drummer Susie Ibarra. As might be expected of the city's brightest ...

2

Article: Radio & Podcasts

Anat Cohen, Weather Report, Craig Taborn and Much More

Read "Anat Cohen, Weather Report, Craig Taborn and Much More" reviewed by Jerome Wilson


This show includes a wide array of jazz musicians from the present and recent past including Anat Cohen, Donny McCaslin, Weather Report, Henry Threadgill and Roy Haynes. Playlist Henry Threadgill Sextett “I Can't Wait Till I Get Home" from The Complete Novus & Columbia Recordings of Henry Threadgill & Air (Mosaic) 00:00 Sextet of ...

20

Article: Building a Jazz Library

What Next After Kind of Blue?

Read "What Next After Kind of Blue?" reviewed by Steve Cook


For those dipping a first toe into jazz, the Miles Davis classic Kind of Blue (Columbia, 1959) is a common initial purchase or listen for many plausible reasons. Web searches for “best jazz albums of all time," or the like, bring up numerous lists that put it at the top and on newcomers' radars. Prominent placement ...

7

Article: Album Review

Jacob Garchik: Assembly

Read "Assembly" reviewed by Mark Corroto


As a consequence of the global pandemic, we have been schooled in the science of virology. Under certain conditions viruses mutate and reorganize into something completely new. That is bad. Mutations can also be heard in the adventurous music of Jacob Garchik. That is good. His trombone leads his Atheist Gospel Trombone Album, his big band, ...

10

Article: Album Review

David Virelles: Nuna

Read "Nuna" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


Cuban-born pianist/composer David Virelles has never been far from the top of the jazz profession in his recording career. His initial appearance as a sideman was with Juno Award winner Jane Bunnett on her 2001 Blue Note release Alma de Santiago. Early in his career he studied with Henry Threadgill and played with Steve Coleman, Chris ...

13

Article: Album Review

Ches Smith: Interpret It Well

Read "Interpret It Well" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


Ches Smith's extraordinary Path of Seven Colors (Pyroclastic Records, 2021) was a breakout recording that placed the drummer/composer at the top of many year-end lists. His sophomore outing on Kris Davis' label bears little similarity to his Pyroclastic debut beyond the artist's knack for discovering unexplored terrain. Interpret It Well reunites the trio of pianist Craig ...


Engage

Contest Giveaways
Enter our latest contest giveaway sponsored by MIG Music
Jazz Polls
Vote for your Favorite Hammond B-3 Organists, Favorite Living Guitarists, Favorite Living Pianists, Favorite Living Bassists and Favorite Living Drummers.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.