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Ralph Towner: The Accidental Guitarist

Ralph Towner: The Accidental Guitarist
Mario Calvitti By

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Ralph Towner is a rather atypical figure in the vast world of jazz guitar. His instruments of choice are the classical guitar, which when he started, in the '60s, was played almost exclusively by guitarists related to Brazilian music like Charlie Byrd, Laurindo Almeida and Bola Sete, and the 12-string guitar, very common in the folk world but virtually unknown to jazz. These choices led Towner to develop his signature instrumental technique without reference to any other guitarist. In doing so, he synthesized his various musical experiences as a self-taught pianist, with degrees in trumpet and composition, who discovered guitar at the age of 22.

A founding member of Oregon in the early '70s, the band that pioneered a bold and innovative fusion of jazz, classical, folk and world music, Towner is one of the prominent names in the roster of the ECM Records label, which has recently released My Foolish Heart after publishing, since 1972, almost his entire discography as a leader.

All About Jazz met with Ralph Towner, in his home in Rome, to learn more about his career and his particular approach to music and to guitar.

All About Jazz: Let's start with some biographical information about your musical education. Did you start your formal training on trumpet?

Ralph Towner: Yes, I was six years old when I started with the trumpet. I was also already playing piano, my mother was a piano teacher but I was such a stubborn child and I refused to take lessons from her, I would just listen to all the piano lessons in the back of the room. I always had this particular gift, composing and improvising is something I did naturally from the very beginning. I really started developing when I started imitating recordings and piano players, but I didn't really get seriously into playing the piano until later.

I played jazz trumpet, I was born in 1940 and I had two much older brothers that were both in second World War and they collected a lot of swing band music and some Duke Ellington and all the Benny Goodman and even Nat "King" Cole Trio recordings, so I learned all those standards, plus playing them on trumpet books, and my mother would play the piano to accompany me. I started playing in Dixieland bands and dance bands when I was really young, my brother-in-law played bass in this dance band and I was allowed to play in this club, I think it was a hotel bar, at 12, and he would take me out out during the intermissions because it was illegal for me to be in the bar [laughs]. I didn't really get interested in becoming a pianist until I heard Bill Evans and Scott LaFaro. I heard a lot of other piano players and I could imitate them a little bit, but my piano was for classical composition. I went to University [where he met and befriended bassist Glen Moore, his future band-mate in Oregon] and my diploma ended up being in composition.

I still hadn't discovered classical guitar until I was in the last year of my university studies, when I heard a student playing it. I was very fascinated and I somehow managed to buy one for almost nothing, I remember it costed about 100$ or something. I started to teach myself and I realized I was not gonna go very far, and play it at the level that I realized it needed to be played at. So I asked around and was told there was a great master professor at the Music Academy in Vienna. I somehow managed to get enough money by working in the summer, got to Europe and hitchhiked all the way to Vienna. I also managed to get accepted in that famous Academy. I only knew two classical guitar pieces, but it was very obvious to that panel of professors that I was a musician, so I got admitted.

The professor was Karl Scheit, a brilliant musical teacher, he didn't speak English so I learned from him in German. The way he taugh was a very wonderful step by step procedure, his whole intention was making the guitar sound to its full potential. I used to live in a single room I managed to find, rented for 12$ a month, I ate hardly anything, and I practiced 9 to 10 hours a day, 7 days a week for a year. At the end of the year I could play classical concerts. I returned to Vienna a second time but by then I had furthered my guitar studies, I had heard Brazilian music and started playing Baden Powell kind of things. Then I went back to studying the piano, the first year I was in Vienna I didn't touch the piano, I didn't go near it, I was completely concentrated on the guitar.

AAJ: Have you ever had other contacts with your classical guitar teacher, Karl Scheit, before his passing in 1993? Do you know how he regarded your musical career?

RT: About nine years after I finished my studies with him, I returned to Vienna to play with my group Oregon in a beautiful gilded concert hall (which I had never had access to when I was there as a student). Karl Scheit was in attendance, and he was thoroughly excited with the concert. He rushed back-stage at the end of the concert, grabbed my arm and took me immediately to his favorite restaurant (hitherto only reserved for Julian Bream and other famous classical guitarists as his guest). He raved about the music and the beauty of improvising with tablas, which he had always longed to do. He came to several of my solo concerts in the following years. This was the Hollywood ending every student would dream about, seeing their mentor in such perfect circumstances.

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