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Sidney Hauser: Justice and Jubilation

Paul Rauch By

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Being a woman player, you feel like you have to put on this smiley face, and be what everyone wants you to be. I feel like I have to represent myself to a higher degree than my male counterparts. I’m really hard on myself. If I feel like I’m not performing in a way that represents female players well, I get really upset. —Sidney Hauser
The hiring of young saxophonist Sidney Hauser, to fill the second alto saxophone chair with the prestigious Seattle Repertory Jazz Orchestra may seem like a musical sidenote to the history of this 17 piece ensemble that was formed in 1995. But considering the marginalization of women instrumentalists in jazz over the course of the genre's history, Hauser's appointment is impactful, and represents only the second full time appointment in the history of SRJO.

While the hiring of a young northwest musician may not seem surprising, considering the culture and competitive success of high school jazz programs in the Seattle area, Hauser's personal journey involves a litany of unlikely circumstances.

SRJO was founded by University of Washington Artist in Residence Michael Brockman, and Clarence Acox, whose Seattle high school jazz band at Garfield High School has won the highly regarded Essentially Ellington competition at Lincoln Center an unprecedented four times. "Clarence is a marvelous advocate for anyone who wants to play this music," says Brockman with admiration. Along with Roosevelt High School band director Scott Brown, Acox has propagated a culture that has spread throughout the greater Seattle area, with real results at Lincoln Center, the most prestigious high school band festival in the world.

Hauser does not hail from one of these celebrated programs, boasting a history of graduates that include Quincy Jones, Ernestine Anderson, and Thomas Marriott. She was raised in the comparative cultural isolation of Whidbey Island, separated from Seattle by thirty miles and a ferry ride across Possession Sound.

Boarding the ferry in the seaside village of Mukilteo, one's senses are filled with salt air, the cries of seabirds, and a sweeping vista of high mountain peaks, hidden coves, and Tahoma sitting like Buddha in peaceful repose to the south. The southern portion of the island is served by South Whidbey High School, where a jazz culture is being launched by inventive and resourceful band director, Chris Harshman. Indeed, Harshman vaulted the program into the same lofty status as Garfield and Roosevelt in 2008, taking his group of islander musicians to Essentially Ellington. South Whidbey's arrival prompted one east coast band director to ask Harshman, "Is there something in the water out there?" At that point, prodigious pianist Aaron Parks was the island's only claim to jazz recognition.

Still, Hauser was not raised in a household surrounded by jazz, and her interest in the music had not yet come to light when she decided to study the clarinet for social reasons apart from her instinct to play trumpet. Most importantly, she was given a choice aside from the generational gender assignment of instruments that has plagued young girls for decades in public schools across the country. She was attracted to strong sounds, to instruments prominently front and center in jazz culture.

Her senior year, the South Whidbey band took first place at the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival in Moscow, Idaho, with Hauser securing first place in the alto saxophone soloist category for her performance of "When Sunny Gets Blue."

"Lionel Hampton was definitely a rewarding and enlightening experience," says Hauser. "No matter how good you think you are, there are always people one step ahead of you, or more. Lionel Hampton is so unique, because you become exposed to a whole spectrum of players, from mediocre to prodigy, yet you all have one thing in common-a love for music." Hauser's interest in jazz began to include saxophonists Sonny Stitt, Joshua Redman, Art Pepper, and Cannonball Adderly, spending considerable time transcribing solos from them all.

"I didn't practice very much until I got to high school and heard the jazz band. Then I started taking lessons from Neil Welch, and that got me more into jazz, recalls Hauser. She then moved on to take lessons from prominent Seattle alto saxophonist Mark Taylor her senior year, a weekly jaunt that involved ferry rides bouncing on the wintry, dark waters of Salish Sea. "I would commute over to take a lesson from him every week. He's one of my biggest inspirations in terms of having a role model for what I want to sound like. I love his sound on tenor and alto," says the young altoist.

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