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Bern Nix: A History In Harmolodics

AAJ Staff By

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The harmony doesn't dictate the direction, the melody does.
New York-based free jazz guitarist Bern Nix is one of the few people who are well-versed in Ornette Coleman's "harmolodics" style. He played with Coleman from 1975-1987, and now leads the Bern Nix Trio in New York City. In his compositions and his intriguing covers of standards, he is always looking in the corners of the music for something new.

Described recently by a viewer on YouTube as being "the Billy Bang of the guitar," Nix's sound is both spare and full, melding Wes Montgomery (for example, as on Montgomery's stops and starts in "Four On Six") and references to guitarists from Tiny Grimes and Barney Kessel to Derek Bailey. His free explorations are couched in a smooth Jimmy Raney-style accent and flow, with his compositions and improvisations based largely on Coleman's harmolodics.

Joining Ornette Coleman

Before joining Coleman, Nix was a student at Berklee School of Music. "At Berklee, they used to give the guitar players hell," he says. "They'd say, 'You can't read.'" One of his teachers, who taught the guitar ensemble class and his arranging class, said: "The only thing to do is to do it every day." Nix still practices reading sheet music daily—he buys classical music and big band music. With classical scores, he will often read off the first violin part. It was also a technique practiced by one of Nix's main influences, guitarist Jimmy Raney.

After graduating from Berklee in 1975, Nix heard that Coleman was looking for a guitarist, so he found Coleman's phone number and rang him up. Nix went to New York and auditioned with Coleman in his loft apartment in Manhattan. Coleman's guitarist at the time was James Blood Ulmer. Nix says, "I first saw Blood in 1975, when he came up to Boston when I was at Berklee. He was playing with Larry Young on organ (and) it was a free concert. He had also played with Joe Henderson on one or two LPs."

Then, in Coleman's apartment, Nix saw Ulmer walk into the room. "I saw him and I said to myself, 'Oh, that's the guy who was playing at Berklee with Larry Young.'" Nix adds, "I was looking for a gig—I didn't want to go back to Ohio." He found his gig, with Coleman's Prime Time electric band, where he played from that year until 1987.

Harmolodics

To play with Coleman, it was necessary for Nix to become accustomed to Coleman's musical approach, the famous style that Coleman named "harmolodics." What is harmolodics? Nix began to answer this question by saying, "Well, that's the big question!" Nix explains that it is melody that leads the way in harmolodics. Indeed, a few moments on a guitar will show that improvising a free (and solo) melody is the easiest way to change key—you don't do it by trying to improvise a series of chord changes.

"It's a different approach to playing," Nix says. He listened to Ulmer to see what was going on with harmolodics and Coleman's sound. "I needed to listen to him play. [Harmolodics] is like [playing] a standard jazz guitar, but only more contemporary—it's a fresh approach to playing jazz guitar. [It's] just a way of looking at music—It's not a system. It's a way of... [handling] the difficulty of dealing with melody, rhythm and harmony... [by way of utilizing] melodic variables... [It's] exploratory. [You find] direction with the melody. The harmony doesn't dictate the direction, the melody does."

He adds, "I see it like counterpoint—contrapuntal lines—so I guess that's one way of looking at it. Somebody once told me they thought harmolodics was counterpoint carried to extremes. I was doing a gig once in Canada with this band. We were playing music that was kind of similar to what we were playing with Ornette. We were doing a gig one night at the club and this guy came up—I think he was with the local university or something—and he said that what we were doing sounded like counterpoint taken to its extremes.

"I [once] said to Ornette that it seemed like counterpoint. I was working with him, rehearsing with him, and we were getting down to a couple of different lines... and I said to him, 'You know, to me this sounds like counterpoint.' He said, 'Well, it's not exactly counterpoint, it's something else.' You know what I mean? The way Ornette uses language, he likes to put his own spin on everything. But to me, it's contrapuntal. I talk to other people and they say the same thing.

"I always thought harmolodics was an open-ended exploration of the meaning of melody, rhythm and harmony; that's the way I see it. [You're asking] what is melody, what is rhythm—what it is. It's more like that, than a big system, you know—it's ways of dealing with it. [You] figure out the different ways of doing [it]."

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