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Take Five With Roberta Piket

Roberta Piket By

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About Roberta Piket
Born in Queens, New York, Roberta inherited a passion for music from both her parents. Her father was the Austrian composer Frederick Piket, who made significant contributions to both the musical liturgy of Reform Judaism and the concert hall with works performed by the New York Philharmonic under conductor Dimitri Metropolis. From her mother, Cynthia, she absorbed the glories of the American Songbook, learning the tunes (and accompanying lyrics) of Porter, Gershwin, Kern, Rodgers, and Berlin. Roberta attended the joint five-year double-degree program at Tufts University and New England Conservatory, graduating with a degree in computer science at the former and a degree in jazz piano from the latter. After a year as a software engineer, she returned to New York to pursue her musical calling, and an NEA grant set her up to study with pianist Richie Beirach. Piket made her recording debut on an album by jazz legend Lionel Hampton. Around the same time, Marian McPartland heard her at the Thelonious Monk Composers Competition and invited her to appear on NPR's Piano Jazz, Piket's first of three appearances on the show. Piket occasionally performs on B-3 organ, leads her own groups at Smalls and Mezzrow, and tours internationally. In recent years she's focused particularly on solo piano performance as well as continuing her work with her trio and sextet.

Instrument(s):
Pianist, organist, arranger, composer, educator, occasional vocalist.

Teachers and/or influences?
At New England Conservatory I studied with Fred Hersch, Stanley Cowell and drummer Bob Moses. In my early 30's I studied only briefly with Sofia Rosoff, but her approach was very influential on my playing. I learned a lot about optimizing my posture and arm position. I studied with Richie Beirach for six years when I moved back to NYC after finishing at NEC. He continues to be an influential friend and mentor.

I knew I wanted to be a musician when...
I first starting singing harmony by ear with friends in sixth grade. But I didn't know I wanted to be a jazz musicians until I was about 15 and heard Walter Bishop, Jr.'s Muse record, Speak Low.

Your sound and approach to music.
My approach is to be open to each situation rather than forcing an agenda onto the music. I like to let the music unfold. I find that if I am open to that, the right approach will find me. Paradoxically, approaching music openly requires a good deal of study and preparation. The greater the foundation you have, the more options you have and the greater the chance of finding the right way in.

Your teaching approach
My approach is to enable the student to have a deep understanding of what she is learning and why, so that she can continue to grow on her own. I don't like teaching beginners. There are plenty of people who excel at that. I love doing clinics and master classes with students who need help getting to the next level or who may have some gaps in their experience.

Your dream band
The great thing about living in the NY area is that you have access to some of the best musicians in the world. You can literally play with your "dream" band. There are some musicians outside of NY that I would love to play with more. I played once with Anthony Cox in the Midwest and it was life-changing. Joe La Barbera, who lives on the west coast, is a drummer I would like to play with again. Of course there are many musicians I've never played with that I would love to play with: Wayne Shorter, Ron Carter, John Abercrombie, Jay Clayton.... The list is endless.

Your favorite recording in your discography and why?
My favorite is always the most recent one, because I always want to be improving. So as I'm writing this my favorite is One for Marian: Celebrating Marian McPartland. I'm especially pleased with this recording because it gave me an opportunity to expose listeners to some of Marian's underplayed compositions, I got to play with a great band composed mainly of good friends of mine, and I wrote some woodwind arrangements that came out very well.

What do you think is the most important thing you are contributing musically?
Musicality. "Telling a story," as Lester Young put it, is so important, no matter what genre you're playing.

The first jazz album I bought was:
Speak Low by the Walter Bishop Trio. It changed my life.

Music you are listening to now:
Mostly I've been listening to mixes of my husband Billy Mintz's new recording which we hope to release soon. It's a quintet with Tony Malaby, John Gross, Hilliard Greene and myself. He really got into the production side of it, and, after we recorded with acoustic piano, he had me come in to overdub some Fender Rhodes and organ parts.

I've also been listening to some Mahler symphonies.

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