All About Jazz

Home » Articles » Interviews

Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

1,523

Horace Silver: Blue Note Records and His Lady Music

By

Sign in to view read count
HS: It's just been the way things went down. I guess that's all I can say. I was out here in '70 at Redd Foxx's club and at the end of 1970 I broke up that band and decided to take a rest. I had just gotten married in September of '70 and I wanted to spend some time at home to be with my wife Barbara. So I decided I wanted to take some time off.

I started, in '69, writing The United States of Mind (Blue Note, 1970)—that three-part series/three record series, and I hadn't finished it, so since I got married, I'd take some time off from being on the road; spend it [time off] at home with my wife and finish writing the The United States of Mind. I had to write lyrics, melodies, arrangements and everything. I had to audition some singers and all of that. I decided I was gonna take about a year off and I was gonna finish up that music and record, which I did, and I stayed home about a year. I intended to come back to work in 1972, but then my son Gregory was born and I just couldn't seem to leave him.

EH: Was this your first child?

HS: Yes, very first one and I was kinda enthralled by him and kept putting it off. And I looked around and two years had gone by. So I said, "Wow, let me go on and get back out there." So I started up a new group and, as of March 1973, I went back to work and have been working ever since. I worked from March, 1973 to now, 1974, and I just haven't had a chance in '73 to get out here. It seems like every time I tried to get a booking in California I could get a couple of weeks in L.A. but not in 'Frisco. They were all booked up or vice versa. It's impossible to come out here for two weeks. I don't make any money. Transportation is very high—unless I have at least a month's work, it's impossible. I just had to wait for a time slot where I could get to more than one city in order to make a profit out of this tour. So we went to 'Frisco first and we went on to Vancouver last week and got two weeks there, which makes the cheese more binding.

EH: At the time you sat down to write the The United States of Mind, were you going into the philosophy of TM? Because I've kept up with most all your albums from that period I became aware of your music. I think that You Gotta Take A Little Love (Blue Note, 1969) seems to have been the initial album which may have catapulted you into that philosophy. That's when you started putting lyrics on the liners—onto the album covers—and your music changed just a wee bit—it differed from your previous work.

HS: That's a very good assumption because you're pretty close to right there. You know, I would say You Gotta Take A Little Love catapulted me into the The United States of Mind. I got interested in writing lyrics about that time and, well, became interested in Metaphysics and Indian philosophies, and Yoga philosophies. I have always been interested in health foods, vitamins; you know, the heath thing. So, I was trying to get the physical thing, the mental thing, and the spiritual thing altogether. I was doing a lot of reading, a lot of soul-searching, a lot of meditation; and I put it altogether and came up with the The United States of Mind, which deals with all of that which I just mentioned; dealing with the physical, the mental and the spiritual things.

EH: You sat down and started the The United States of Mind series and formed a new group. Why didn't you include name musicians? Prior to this album, you had been using musicians who had been around.

HS: You mean the The United States of Mind records?

EH: When I saw you in '69 you had...

HS: Randy Brecker on trumpet, Bennie Maupin on sax, John Williams on bass, and I think I had Billy Cobham on drums.

EH: Would you say that was the last time you used name musicians? Out here in L.A. you're using musicians I never heard of; and I'm sure they have experience behind them. People are used to seeing you with heavyweights like Stanley Turrentine or Joe Henderson.

HS: I never worked with Stanley Turrentine. He just made a record with me—he's never traveled with me—he's a leader in his own right. So I couldn't hire him. He's got his own band; he just made a record with me.

EH: Well, I mean you're using younger musicians who are kinda unknown.

HS: Everybody I've used was unknown at one time. Blue Mitchell was unknown when I first used him; so was Junior Cook; all of these guys; so was Benny Maupin when he first came with me; so was Randy Brecker. You know all these guys were unknown when they first joined me.

EH: OK. We hit on the same thing; you look like the way Blakey was doing with the Messengers—taking young guys in, working with them, and when they've built a repertoire and got a name, they went out on their own. That seems like what you're doing.

Tags

Related Video

comments powered by Disqus

Related Articles

Read Linley Hamilton: Strings Attached Interviews
Linley Hamilton: Strings Attached
by Ian Patterson
Published: April 17, 2018
Read Camille Bertault: Unity in Diversity Interviews
Camille Bertault: Unity in Diversity
by Ludovico Granvassu
Published: April 10, 2018
Read Chad Taylor: Myths and Music Education Interviews
Chad Taylor: Myths and Music Education
by Jakob Baekgaard
Published: April 9, 2018
Read Fabian Almazan Interviews
Fabian Almazan
by Angelo Leonardi
Published: March 30, 2018
Read Ryuichi Sakamoto: Naturally Born to Seek Diversity Interviews
Ryuichi Sakamoto: Naturally Born to Seek Diversity
by Nenad Georgievski
Published: March 27, 2018
Read Leonardo Pavkovic: Nothing is Ordinary Interviews
Leonardo Pavkovic: Nothing is Ordinary
by Chris M. Slawecki
Published: March 16, 2018
Read "Linley Hamilton: Strings Attached" Interviews Linley Hamilton: Strings Attached
by Ian Patterson
Published: April 17, 2018
Read "Dan Monaghan: The Man Behind The Swing" Interviews Dan Monaghan: The Man Behind The Swing
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: February 16, 2018
Read "Hugh Masekela: Strength in Music and Character" Interviews Hugh Masekela: Strength in Music and Character
by R.J. DeLuke
Published: January 23, 2018
Read "Eric Ineke: Surveying the European Jazz Scene" Interviews Eric Ineke: Surveying the European Jazz Scene
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: September 6, 2017