All About Jazz

Home » Search Center » Results: Jimmie Lunceford

Results for "Jimmie Lunceford"

Advanced search options

MUSICIAN Born:

Jimmie Lunceford

Jimmie Lunceford led what many consider to be the best swing orchestra of the 1930s. Flashy and talented, Lunceford's band was without a doubt the most entertaining of its day. No one who saw it in performance could ignore the group's infectious attitude and enthusiastic presence. Many of the era's top bandleaders openly borrowed from Lunceford's showmanship. Lunceford spent his formative years in Denver, Colorado, where he studied music under Paul Whiteman's father and in 1922 played saxophone with George Morrison's orchestra at the Empress Theatre. In 1926 he earned a bachelor's degree from Fisk University in Nashville. Lunceford also attended the City College in New York. During school breaks he performed with such artists as Wilbur Sweatman, Elmer Snowden, John C

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

Idris Ackamoor: An Afro-Futurist Odyssey

Read "Idris Ackamoor: An Afro-Futurist Odyssey" reviewed by Chris May

In summer 2020, Idris Ackamoor will release Shaman! on Britain's Strut label. It is his third album with the post-2015 incarnation of his 1970s band, The Pyramids. It reunites Ackamoor with flautist Margaux Simmons, with whom he had co-founded The Pyramids in 1972. Ackamoor's route to Afro-Futurist jazz began in the US in ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Nichols, Newk with Kenny/Elmo, Prez & More

Read "Nichols, Newk with Kenny/Elmo, Prez & More" reviewed by Marc Cohn

We're rotating through our 2019 centenarians--this week Herbie Nichols with tracks from his first Blue Note LP. Our artist log tells me it's time for another deep dive into the vault, including another piano faceoff (because you loved the last one): this time Fats Waller versus Teddy Wilson & Art Tatum. There's more Newk too, recordings ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part II

Read "Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands, Part II" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Part 1 | Part 2 Part 1 of Blue Highways and Sweet Music: The Territory Bands looked at the roots, drivers and challenges of the travelling groups who brought jazz music to the non-urban areas of the Southern Plains, through one-night-stands, in often impromptu venues. A black phenomenon, often misappropriated by white musicians, promoters, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

The Glenn Crytzer Orchestra: Ain't It Grand?

Read "Ain't It Grand?" reviewed by Jack Bowers

As Karen Carpenter once sang, it's “yesterday once more"--at least it is whenever and wherever the gregarious Glenn Crytzer Orchestra springs into action. Crytzer's ensemble not only revitalizes songs from the long-ago Swing Era of the 1920s, '30s and '40s, its high-stepping two-CD set, Ain't It Grand?, even sounds as though it were recorded in those ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part II: New York

Read "Culture Clubs: A History of the U.S. Jazz Clubs, Part II: New York" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Jazz didn't abandon jny: Chicago but its further development only began to take on a distinct personality in the 1960s. By the late 1920s, the next phase of the jazz scene had shifted from Chicago to New York though, initially, there was no red carpet rolled out. As jazz bands made their way to New York ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rick Hirsch's Big Ol' Band: Pocono Git-Down

Read "Pocono Git-Down" reviewed by Richard J Salvucci

Years ago, in liner notes forgotten somewhere, Phil Woods said, “There are good players everywhere. You don't have to go to New York to find them," or words to that effect. I was reminded of that observation listening to Rick Hirsch's . It is composed of players from Central Pennsylvania, with Hirsch himself in State College. ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

Thomas Marriott: Balance in Life and Music

Read "Thomas Marriott: Balance in Life and Music" reviewed by Paul Rauch

If one should by chance be curious of what is happening with jazz in the city of Seattle, and the Pacific Northwest, one would do well to check out what trumpeter Thomas Marriott is up to. Thomas has established himself as one the most exciting artists to emerge on the national jazz scene in the past ...

ARTICLE: BOOK EXCERPTS

The Royal Roost: Birthplace of Bop

Read "The Royal Roost: Birthplace of Bop" reviewed by Richard Carlin

The story of the development of jazz in New York is tied to the story of a few seminal clubs and promoters who helped nurture the music. Just as new musical styles were developing during World War II that would lead to the birth of bebop, so was the jazz scene changing. The clubs that thrived ...

Mark Kleinhaut, Nat Janoff, Guillermo Bazzola, and Shan Arsenault

Read "Mark Kleinhaut, Nat Janoff, Guillermo Bazzola, and Shan Arsenault" reviewed by Dom Minasi

Welcome back to Guitarists Rendezvous, our second installment in a series that introduces readers to emerging or established guitarists who fly just under the radar of public recognition. Each will field the same four questions and we've included audio and video so you can sample their music. This installment includes a diverse group ...


ENGAGE

Enter our contest giveaways

Contest Giveaway

Win a chance at some outstanding big band and brass-powered releases by entering the Summit Records contest giveaway! One click entry.

Contest Guidelines

Reader's Poll: It's your festival. Who do you book?

Fantasy Festival Poll

It's your festival, you're in charge of booking and you have an unlimited budget. Share your lineup.

More Polls

Publisher's Desk

More Contests, more winners! Look for two monthly giveaways starting soon. Learn more.

MORE POSTS

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.