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Down With Jazz 2014

Ian Patterson By

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There's a lot of really exceptional music going on in Dublin right now, and the media should be telling people about it in an informed way. —Lauren Kinsella
Down With Jazz
Meeting House Square
Dublin, Ireland
May 31-June 1, 2014

There's nothing quite like a Bank Holiday weekend, sunshine and music. Having moved from 2013's September slot with its unpredictable autumn weather to the last weekend in May with its unpredictable spring weather, Down With Jazz 2014 passed off dryly, which raised the spirits and surely contributed to the dancing that broke out sporadically.

It was the combination of spirits—of the alcoholic kind—and jazzy dancing that incited the ire of the Catholic Church in 1930s Ireland. The threat to the old ways and to the authority of the Church was really the issue and lead to street demonstrations in 1934, demonstrations whose slogans inspired Down With Jazz's name eighty years later. Father Conefrey, who was at the head of the anti-jazz rally in Leitrim on New Year's Day 1934, equated jazz—and more specifically the unsupervised dancing it inspired—with paganism and lustful desire. Down with that sort of thing!

"Dancing is a vertical expression of a horizontal desire," playwright George Bernard Shaw was credited as saying, a good dozen years after he died. That quotation has also been attributed variously to writer Oscar Wilde and poet Robert Frost, but perhaps one of them nicked it from Father Conefrey when he wasn't looking. Had Cloone's most famous parish priest been present in Meeting House Square for the third edition of DWJ he would have struggled to equate the rather diverse music on offer with that which so upset the Irish Church in 1934. He would, however, no doubt have been delighted to learn that dancing has practically no part in modern jazz culture. These days, jazz may move heads and toes, but bums are usually firmly rooted to quite comfy chairs.

Reduced from three evenings to two, DWJ may have downsized in terms of the number of bands showcased but organizer Gerry Godley and his Improvised Music Company's commitment to showcasing the best of Dublin's vibrant jazz/creative music scene remains intact. And the crowd has grown, with attendance visibly up from last year—an encouraging sign that there's arguably a growing appetite for this sort of music.

First up on Saturday evening was the Tommy Halferty Trio. Derry guitarist Halferty, a veteran of the Irish jazz scene since the late 1970s studied with Irish guitar legend Louis Stewart and over the years has performed with singer Norma Winstone, saxophonist Lee Konitz, guitarist John Abercrombie and pianist Martial Solal, in addition to leading his own groups. Halferty, with bassist Dave Redmond and drummer Kevin Brady was showcasing tunes from his new album, Burkina (2014), recently launched at BelloBar .

On the bop-inflected "D42" and "Airflight," the trio played with the sort of tight-but-loose intensity of drummer Ginger Baker's 1990s trio with guitarist Bill Frisell and bassist Charlie Haden. "Algiers De Blanche" was an elegant, slower-paced number with a lovely, meandering solo from Halferty. Redmond, whose recent Roots (Fresh Sound New Talent, 2013) was one of the outstanding Irish releases of last year, followed suit with an equally lyrical solo.

Halferty's lyricism and melodic soloing belongs to the school of Stewart or Belgian guitarist Philip Catherine, but there's greater fire in his playing reminiscent at times of guitarist John Scofield and Sco's catchy "Everybody's Party" was indeed a perfect fit for Halferty's more aggressive playing. An older tune, whose titled was lost in translation, revolved around Redmond's fast-walking bass and saw another great solo from Halferty. Hopefully, Halferty's trio will find the means to take this music around Ireland, for there surely aren't many better jazz guitar trios in the country.

After the Tommy Halferty Trio the jazz element of DWJ was served up in various guises. OKO, the electro-acoustic quartet of guitarist Shane Latimer is a fairly new band, but its debut recording I Love You Computer Mountain (Diatribe Records, 2014) already points to a creative unit brimming with ideas.

"Shoehorns and Axelgrease" opened the set with drummer Shane O'Donovan on mallets and minimalist touches from turntabalist/sampler DJackulate's and keyboardist Darragh O'Kelly creating a dreamy soundscape. Spoken word tapes filtered through the mix as a dub beat took over. Sci-fi sounds and busy drums became more prominent as the music swelled, providing the backdrop for O'Kelly's mazy solo.

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