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12 Points 2015

Ian Patterson By

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What will jazz be like in ten, twenty or fifty years from now? What will be the main influences on it? I think we're hearing the genesis of that in some of the music we're hearing in this festival. —Kenneth Killeen, Improvised Music Company
12 Points 2015
Project Arts Centre
Dublin, Ireland
April 15-18, 2015

In an international calendar absolutely bulging with jazz festivals, 12 Points—conceived in Dublin by Improvised Music Company in 2007—stands out as one of the more original. It's not just the diversity and quality of the music that sets Twelve Points apart, after all, there's no shortage of festivals boasting great, eclectic programmes. Nor is it just the fact that 12 Points alternates between Dublin and other European cities, which is unusual in itself. Where 12 Points significantly differs from many other music festivals is it that backs largely unknown bands/artists from across Europe.

Whereas most festivals balk at the idea of risk, 12 Points entices the audience with the risk factor and in the process has developed audiences that come to the music with an open mind to be sure, but expecting innovation and originality. Helping develop the bands' careers and building audiences receptive to music that shies away from codified styles and easy categorization seem to be the twin engines driving the 12 Points juggernaut.

Following another successful jaunt to mainland Europe in Umea 2014, 12 Points 2015 returned to its spiritual home of Dublin, where it all began nine years ago. The four days at the Project Arts Centre served up an amazingly eclectic range of music on its main program and also showcased several of Ireland's most promising young jazz/improvised music outfits.

Recent editions have seen 12 Points expand its purview by gathering together music industry professionals, journalists, and academics to encourage meaningful exchanges and inspire new ideas to promote jazz/improvised music throughout Europe. 12 Points 2015 was no exception. But the real stars of the show were the musicians themselves and there was plenty of compelling, provocative and exciting music to digest.

Day One

Auditive Connection

It can be no easy task to open a festival but Strasbourg four-piece Auditive Connection rose to the occasion with a confident, visceral performance that was as engaging as it was unpredictable. Cellist Anil Eraslan and guitarist Gregory Dargent forged punchy unison riffs and coruscating individual lines over drummer Frédéric Guérin's muscular pop-rock rhythms and vocalist Jeanne Barbieri's idiosyncratic vocal stylings.

On the opener "Monsters" Auditive Connection's music gravitated between King Crimson-like grunge and leaner indie-rock, and although both elements raised their heads from time to time during the set the music was a constantly unfolding mystery. Barbieri's seemingly Latin-sounding liturgy gave way to her invented language vocalisations on "Tontra," a riff-heavy number that included light-hearted shouting, caterwauling and collective Monty Python-esque semaphore. The goalposts were moved again on the episodic "Tra La La" which moved eerily through the gears from neo-classical to psychedelic and noirish universes.

More left-field still, were "Tao Po"—where Barbieri's meditative interpretation of Samuel Beckett's "Texts for Nothing" was bookended by a fierce punk-rock aesthetic—and the brooding closing number, which featured text by Jack Kerouac and—in keeping with the obscure paths Auditive Connection's music went down—a drum solo featuring a towel.

Moskus

The trio of pianist Anja Lauvdal, bassist Fredrik Luhr Dietrichson and drummer Hans Hulbaekmo came together while studying at the Trondheim Conservatory of Music: "It's a very opening method of teaching," said Hulbaekmo before the gig, "you learn about playing from within, not about styles." Accordingly, there was something hermetic about Moskus' internal idiom, one that contained no overt references and which eschewed most typical piano trio conventions.

In an uninterrupted hour, the music's spare architecture evolved slowly. Lauvdal's delicate piano intro gave way to a repeating MIDI-generated mantra, while Hulbaekmo's pattering drums and flickering thumb-piano were accompanied by an insistent bass pulse. Gradually the overlapping waves intensified, creating a powerfully enveloping atmosphere where drone, minimalist pulses and percussive accents converged.

The swell gradually abated after half an hour and a pocket of silence invited hesitant applause. Immediately, the trio pounced on the applauders, sonically that is, and carried on with a lithe free-form improvisation that went from fairly dissonant and rhythmically fractured passages to the sort of flowing invention suggestive of Craig Taborn's trio with William Parker and Gerald Cleaver. A grooving bass ostinato redirected the trio, coaxing Lauvdal to her most melodic phrasing, while Hulbaekmo maintained a delightfully light touch. A processional closing passage, gently upbeat and hymnal, was the first sign of any pre-configured plan.

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