All About Jazz

Home » Search Center » Results: Stevie Wonder

Results for "Stevie Wonder"

Advanced search options

Musician

Stevie Wonder

Born:

b. Steveland Judkins, 13 May 1950, Saginaw, Michigan, USA. Born Judkins, Wonder now prefers to be known as Steveland Morris after his mother's married name. Placed in an incubator immediately after his birth, baby Steveland was given too much oxygen, causing Steveland to suffer permanent blindness. Despite this handicap, Wonder began to learn the piano at the age of seven, and had also mastered drums and harmonica by the age of nine. After his family moved to Detroit in 1954, Steveland joined a church choir, the gospel influence on his music balanced by the R&B of Ray Charles and Sam Cooke being played on his transistor radio. In 1961, he was discovered by Ronnie White of the Miracles, who arranged an audition at Motown Records

14

Article: Album Review

Brian Jackson: Jazz Is Dead 8: Brian Jackson

Read "Jazz Is Dead 8: Brian Jackson" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


The Jazz is Dead series of recordings is neither trying to bury or resurrect the genre. It largely exists on the periphery where “jazz" is either a prefix or suffix. The project, launched by musician-producers Adrian Younge and Ali Shaheed Muhammad in 2020, is prolific and elastic in its choice of artists and styles. Younge and ...

35

Article: So You Don't Like Jazz

Top Ten Kennedy Center Musical Moments

Read "Top Ten Kennedy Center Musical Moments" reviewed by Alan Bryson


It's a good bet that most of us have heard people say they don't like jazz, or even worse, drop the H-bomb: “I hate jazz." If you choose to engage them, the key is to tread lightly and tailor an approach that considers their tastes and sensibilities. This So You Don't Like Jazz column explores ways ...

15

Article: Interview

Cameron Graves: Inventing Thrash-Jazz

Read "Cameron Graves: Inventing Thrash-Jazz" reviewed by Scott Krane


Pianist and composer, Cameron Graves, arrived on the scene in his late teens and early twenties, possessing a proclivity for classical music, an unquenchable passion for heavy metal, and a jazz sensibility and lexicon of musicality. According to the website of Mack Avenue Records, the label that signed Graves and put out his debut solo release, ...

2

Article: Multiple Reviews

New Memphis Colorways and Utopia: Way Outside the Box

Read "New Memphis Colorways and Utopia: Way Outside the Box" reviewed by Doug Collette


Rendering cliches moot is no small achievement. Yet if these two records prove anything, it is that it's possible to accomplish this daunting task in a variety of ways. In the case of Paul Taylor, aka New Memphis Colorways, his truth lies in the restoration of the fundamental notion a single individual can indeed sound like ...

4

Article: Album Review

Antonio Tosques and Multi-Form Band: Touch Me

Read "Touch Me" reviewed by Nicholas F. Mondello


With the possible exception of the upright bass (where it's more of a pas a deux), a guitar allows its player to bring the instrument intimately close to their heart and inner voice. The fingered manipulation of strings can trigger caresses, teases, intensities and poetry. Played well, as it is here on this excellent recording from ...

10

Article: SoCal Jazz

John Patitucci: The Quintessence of Acoustic and Electric

Read "John Patitucci: The Quintessence of Acoustic and Electric" reviewed by Jim Worsley


John Patitucci had his life's work in mind at age twelve, At a time when most of us were worried about junior high school and pimples, Patitucci concluded that he was to be a professional musician. This was no typical young boy fantasy of playing center field for the Yankees, being an astronaut, or even being ...

5

Article: Interview

Samara Joy: Ascension Into Jazz

Read "Samara Joy: Ascension Into Jazz" reviewed by R.J. DeLuke


When Samara Joy performs, she takes her place, stands confidently and sings. Immediately the strength and richness of her voice—which is natural—grabs the attention of the listener. There are no gyrations. It's refreshing that a young artist doesn't see the need for unnecessary vocal gymnastics. Too often, those can miss the mark. Her style ...

7

Article: Album Review

Dan Wilson: Vessels Of Wood And Earth

Read "Vessels Of Wood And Earth" reviewed by Chris May


Dan Wilson's Vessels Of Wood And Earth starts well. Just over a minute into track one, the guitarist launches into a lightning-speed solo which sounds a little like Wes Montgomery channeling Charlie Parker on speed. On track two, Stevie Wonder's well named “Bird Of Beauty," he rings the changes, exchanging Montgomery and Parker for Pat Metheny ...

12

Article: SoCal Jazz

Bill Cunliffe: Always Doing It The Right Way

Read "Bill Cunliffe: Always Doing It The Right Way" reviewed by Jim Worsley


Most notably a jazz pianist, it comes as more than a surprise that Bill Cunliffe was not in the same orbit as jazz until he was in college. With the sheer volume of top shelf jazz he has written and recorded since, he would seem to have made up for any lost time. That time, those ...


Engage

Contest Giveaways
Enter our latest contest giveaway sponsored by MPS
Publisher's Desk
Build Your Website Using Bandzoogle
Read on.

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded albums and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, limited reopenings and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary step that will help musicians and venues now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the sticky footer ad). Thank you!

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.