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Damión Reid: On Drum Artistry, The Robert Glasper Trio, and Beyond

Damión Reid: On Drum Artistry, The Robert Glasper Trio, and Beyond
K. Shackelford By

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When you’re uncomfortable, that is probably the most magical, unique or perhaps progressive musical situation that can occur. Great things can happen when you are uncomfortable or when you have taken a chance. —Damión Reid
International drummer Damión Reid has crafted a style that is inimitable without sacrificing the ardor of modern jazz and its traditional stylistic approaches to drumming. Listening to Reid is like a history lesson on the drum—he can play everything with artful dexterity from Be-Bop to Hip Hop.

Adrian Kirchler, owner of AK drums, was so impressed by Reid's performance at a concert that it inspired him to create a snare drum entitled, "The Damión Reid Signature Model." However, his sound didn't come without paying his dues. During high school, while most teenagers would spend time at the mall or playing video games, Reid spent his weekends with legendary drummer Billy Higgins, a long-time family friend. From there, he refined his artistry at three of America's most rigorous music schools which include, The New England Conservatory, The New School in New York, and The Thelonious Monk Institute at the University of Southern California.

While at The New School in New York, he met pianist/composer/producer Robert Glasper and they quickly became friends, playing together often at different gigs. Eventually, The Robert Glasper Trio was formed and Reid became Glasper's drummer. Last year, their fourth album Covered, (Blue Note, 2015), received a Grammy nomination for Best Jazz Instrumental Album. Reid's entrancing technical style infuses postmodern music's digital sensibilities and fragmentation on the drums—in ways that are unobtrusive—and has made him a strong testament to Glasper's trio sound. In his performances, it is clear that he respects the millennial's ear. In the past 15 years, Reid has also played on albums with a variety of jazz musicians with powerful styles including Laurent Coq, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Steve Lehman, Liberty Ellman, Jonathan Finlayson, and the list is growing.

In this interview, Reid discusses cultural influences on his sound, the groups he has played with, The Robert Glasper Trio, and more.

All About Jazz: AK drums created the Damión Reid Signature model, which was inspired by your "unmistakable sound." How did this come about?

Damión Reid: I acquired a drum from Adrian Kirchler, who owns AK drums, and he came to a show when I was in Italy and he heard me play. He was very complimentary and appreciative of my performance, and one of the things he noticed is that I used orchestral snare drums. He said, "Man, you actually use orchestral snare drums with a drum kit?" And I responded, "Yeah, I do." He thought that was unique and a good idea, because he hadn't seen that at all. He liked the way it sounded. He specializes in alloy and he knows that I like the copper sound, because that is what I acquired from him in the past.

So we began a conversation about my complaint about staying in the pianissimo range while playing fast ideas around the drum kit. When you play over the snares, there are different areas that you may play for certain dynamics. So the snare drum that he created for me combines elements that he thought would enhance the pianissimo range attack area, while playing the drum set. When you play a traditional snare drum, the snares are not fanned. So my snare drum fans the snares so that you broaden the attack area. He took the sensitivity of the orchestral sound and allowed me to utilize it more efficiently while playing the drum set. Obviously, you can still concentrate and still hit the sweet spot. I was just telling him that when I am playing in the pianissimo range, it would be optimum to have certain kind of sounds. We were talking and "nerding out" about the snare. To me, it wasn't that much of a problem but Kirchler said he had an idea that would optimize playing the drum set while using an orchestral snare drum. He said my playing and watching me play inspired him to create this particular kind of snare drum. He told me that if I appreciated the snare drum he would attach my name to it. If I didn't like it, he said he still wanted to call it the DR model. He sent me the drum, and I liked it. We also talked about different specs and different snare specifications. I agreed to sign on to his project and the rest is history.

AAJ: What a kind gesture, and also gift to jazz drummers who struggle with that problem.

DR: It's an honor to have anything made for you. But it's also an honor when someone is inspired to make something because of how you play. I felt like it was a great honor to have a drum maker enhance what I'm doing and give me a unique sound that would help me to do all the things that I want to do with the snare drum— while I played the drum kit. It was very nice and considerate.

AAJ: I have heard of drum companies endorsing an artist, but for someone to craft an instrument inspired by the way a person plays is spectacular.

DR: Yeah it is. The biggest thing that impressed me was that he was inspired to make new technology and play with the limitations of the snare drum and where it has been for decades. And he essentially decided to create a whole new way of mounting snares so that it could create a different sound. When someone is inspired by your drumming to push the boundaries of the way an instrument is made because they see your exploration of the snare—that's an honor most definitely.

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