5

Peter Brötzmann / Paul G. Smyth: Tongue In A Bell

Mark Corroto By

Sign in to view read count
Peter Brötzmann / Paul G. Smyth: Tongue In A Bell
There are only a handful of pianists the great reedist Peter Brötzmann has worked with. Back in the Machine Gun (FMP, 1968) days it was Fred Van Hove at the keyboards. Then there was Misha Mengelberg and Alexander von Schlippenbach, plus those Berlin sessions with Cecil Taylor, and the new millennium recordings with Japanese pianist Masahiko Satoh: Yatagarasu (Not Two, 2012) and Long Story Short (Trost, 2013). Add to that list Irishman Paul G. Smyth.

This 2015 live concert at the National Concert Hall in Dublin captures, with brilliant sound, this piano/reeds duo. It is a loud and intimate affair, and that's not an oxymoron. When Brötzmann is in the house, plaster and mortar are at risk. The same can be said with Smyth at the piano, very much like the saxophonist's recent duos with pedal steel guitarist Heather Leigh, the machine gun adds a bit of a suppressor. But the saxophonist sheds none of his patented intensity.

The disc is comprised of the title track at 25 minutes and two shorter duos clocking in less than 10. The guess is that these two artists had never previously performed together. They open with the rapid churn of white waters, as a way to get their bearings and chase unsuspecting smooth jazz fans from the concert hall. Brötzmann's tenor saxophone blasts ballistic notes against the dense chords and, at times, the fists of Smyth. As their boat settles less notes come forth, but their strength intensifies. Eventually, Brötzmann moves to the background and Smyth produces a bright and shimmering solo. Rejoined by the the saxophone, the pair ease into a blues riff favorite by the saxophonist. Again, Brötzmann quiets and Smyth carries the mail, Cecil-like. Next the saxophone is swapped for taragato. With this this conversation dives deeper as the two have become confederates. The lengthy track signals its endpoint with Smyth's roiling thunder of notes as Brötzmann quiets his demons. The remaining two tracks are more intimate, with Smyth working more of the interior and body of his piano, and Brötzmann on clarinet before ending on tenor. Its hello/goodbye, let's meet again soon.

Track Listing

Tongue In A Bell; Falling Out Of All The Towers Of Space; Eyes Wide.

Personnel

Peter Brötzmann: woodwinds; Paul G. Smyth: piano.

Album information

Title: Tongue In A Bell | Year Released: 2020 | Record Label: Weekertoft

Post a comment about this album

Tags

Shop Amazon

More

Read Human Dust Suite
Human Dust Suite
Miki Yamanaka
Read You're It!
You're It!
The Mike Melito/Dino Losito Quartet
Read TEST and Roy Campbell
TEST and Roy Campbell
TEST and Roy Campbell
Read 4K
4K
Modasaurus
Read Signals
Signals
Trio Linguae
Read History Gets Ahead of the Story
History Gets Ahead of the Story
Jeff Cosgrove / John Medeski / Jeff Lederer
Read Prism
Prism
Conference Call

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.