Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

19

Dan Weiss: Sixteen: Drummers Suite

Karl Ackermann By

Sign in to view read count
Dan Weiss began his professional drumming career touring with the likes of saxophonists David Binney, Lee Konitz, Rudresh Mahantthapa, among others. Weiss has also been studying tabla with Pandit Samir Chatterjee for two decades and has been named a top drummer in a number of prominent polls. Sixteen: Drummers Suite bears more than a passing resemblance to Weiss' Fourteen (Pi Recordings, 2014) at least in terms of the music's development and the cohort of musicians.

Weiss' inspiration for Sixteen: Drummers Suite is not confined to the legendary drummers whose specific contributions within larger works serve as jumping-off points for these through-composed pieces. Weiss studied the work of Iannis Xenakis, a Romanian-born architect and composer who often used mathematical models in composing. His final composition, in 1997, was written for percussion soloist and chamber orchestra. Another inspiration is Danish composer Per Nørgård, whose noteworthy composition "I Ching" (1982) was written for solo percussion.

Weiss opens with a brief solo, "The Drummers Meet," flowing directly into "Elvin" and touching off complex rhythms and unexpected deviations. The Elvin Jones inspired piece is the first of several, almost psychedelic saturations of buzzing electronics, wordless vocals and ensemble playing woven together by this master percussionist. "Max" (referencing Max Roach, of course) adds a spoken word loop in staccato, rap mode. One of the most classic references is "Tony," as in Tony Williams, and derived from the drummer's performance on Miles Davis's "Nefertiti." Opening with a warm solo from bassist Thomas Morgan and then joined by pianist and keyboardist Jacob Sacks and Matt Mitchell, respectively, the vocalists and larger ensemble take the piece on an uninhibited ride. Sacks closes the tune with a hymn-like piano solo.

Remaining compositions are based on very brief, particular phrases from Philly Joe Jones, Kenny Clarke and Ed Blackwell. The Blackwell piece is the most reflective and direct on the album, opening with moody sax but moving through a wide range of changes over its fifteen-plus minute length. It closes with Miles Okazaki's pensive guitar and the distant pulse of Weiss. Much of the satisfaction in listening to Sixteen: Drummers Suite lies in the levels that reveal themselves over repeated listening. Despite the intricacies that Weiss revels in, there are coherent qualities throughout the music. The compositions are both powerful and fantastical and the sixteen musicians persistently take advantage of the potential in these unique creations.

Track Listing: The Drummers Meet; Elvin; Max; Tony; Philly Joe; Klook; Ed.

Personnel: Dan Weiss: compositions, drums, tabla, vocal percussion; Thomas Morgan: acoustic bass; Jacob Sacks: piano; Matt Mitchell: keyboard, piano, glockenspiel, organ, vibraphone; Miles Okazaki: guitars, vocal percussion; Stephen Cellucci: percussion, vocal percussion; Katie Andrews: harp; Anna Webber: flute, alto flute; David Binney: alto saxophone; Miguel Zenon: alto saxophone; Ohad Talmor: tenor saxophone; Jacob Garchik: trombone, tuba; Ben Gerstein: trombone; Judith Berkson: voice; Lana Is: voice; Jen Shyu: voice.

Title: Sixteen: Drummers Suite | Year Released: 2016 | Record Label: Pi Recordings

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Album Reviews
Interviews
Album Reviews
Rhythm In Every Guise
Album Reviews
Read more articles
Starebaby

Starebaby

Pi Recordings
2018

buy
Sixteen: Drummers Suite

Sixteen: Drummers...

Pi Recordings
2016

buy
Fourteen

Fourteen

Pi Recordings
2014

buy
 

Timshel

Sunnyside Records
2011

buy
Jhaptal Drumset Solo

Jhaptal Drumset Solo

Chhandayan Production
2011

buy
Timshel

Timshel

Sunnyside Records
2010

buy

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Runner in the Rain Album Reviews
Runner in the Rain
By Jack Bowers
January 22, 2019
Read Driftglass Album Reviews
Driftglass
By Chris May
January 22, 2019
Read Pure Magic Album Reviews
Pure Magic
By Mark Sullivan
January 22, 2019
Read Vera Album Reviews
Vera
By Jerome Wilson
January 22, 2019
Read Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz Album Reviews
Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz
By Dan McClenaghan
January 21, 2019
Read The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two Album Reviews
The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two
By Victor L. Schermer
January 21, 2019
Read Mesophase Album Reviews
Mesophase
By Glenn Astarita
January 21, 2019