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10

Ryan Keberle: Multicolored Tapestry

R.J. DeLuke By

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Jazz has the ability to be more emotionally powerful than any other music because of the high quality of musicians, the spontaneity and the depth of personal expression you find in jazz. —Ryan Keberle
Ryan Keberle is a musician with open ears, who listens to all kinds of music with the attitude that in most cases something can be learned from it. He listens as a fan and as a musician. It can be just to enjoy rock, alternative, pop, R&B or blues. But there might be a kernel of something that will stick with him, maybe influencing in his gripping and supple trombone solos, or in his writing and arranging.

He plays trombone. But also piano. And he sings. His considerable—and growing— talents extend to writing and arranging. Those are the threads he spins through the loom of his mind and heart that results in the tapestry of his art. It's a tapestry of many colors.

"Other kinds of music are important to me as a listener and as a music fan and as a musician," says Keberle. "A lot of the music I listen to over the years, or the music that's moved me the most, isn't jazz. That's not because I'm not a jazz fan. I love it to death. But I think that's something jazz musicians can learn from. Jazz has the ability to be more emotionally powerful than any other music because of the high quality of musicians, the spontaneity and the depth of personal expression you find in jazz. But often times, that's not the case. I think a lot about that and I use other music—pop music, folk music, Latin music—as guides and models."

The Spokane, Washington, native not only uses other music, he plays in diverse settings and tries to learn from each. He has toured with the acclaimed indie rocker Sufjan Stevens as well as the bands of Maria Schneider and Darcy James Argue. He's played with Wynton Marsalis and the likes of Alicia Keys and Justin Timberlake. Keberle has played on movie soundtracks and in the pit for the Tony-winning Broadway musical "In the Heights."

"I'm not trying to play pop music," he says of his own recordings. "I'm not trying to even channel it. But I'm looking to take lessons that I've learned from that music and things that make that music great and stand the test of time. Why do we still listen to and talk about the Beatles' music when they haven't recorded anything in 50 years? Why is that music still important? Those are the things I'm interested in learning more about and the kind of things I hope to apply to my music. Most people listen to music because it moves them somehow."

Music Is Emotion is the title of Keberle's latest recording with his band Catharsis. It's also one of his credos. The disk is remarkable, as are the musicians he chose to bring the music to life; the same ones he has been touring with, for the most part, to present the music. It's jazz music. It's melodic and moving. The improvisations, always important to Keberle the player, are exquisite. For this recording, and this band which he is justly proud of, there is no pianist, and it presented a new set of challenges for this musician with inquiring mind.

"It's one of the interesting things about the group and it's also one of the challenging things about the group. My first two records were with a large ensemble, relatively speaking. One of the reasons for having an ensemble of that size. is I love to arrange. I'm a huge student of the arranging history of jazz," he says. "It was one of the reasons I was hesitant to do a small group thing. But what I found, by hearing more music of various kinds, was that by taking away the piano and the guitar, you were forced to arrange because otherwise there was no kind of clear or preconceived harmony being stated by the band."

Keberle said arranging for Catharsis isn't necessarily about adding color tones and creating different textures. "It's a more utilitarian approach to arranging in that I've got three notes—sometimes four because Jorge [Roeder, bass] is an absolute monster on the bass—and you need all three to create any kind of traditional chord. Even when you get into more ambiguous or non-standard harmonic sound, you still need those three notes most of the time. You don't have that many options. I found that, originally, to be a challenge because I wasn't used to it. But what I found in the end was, when I began thinking only in terms of three or four notes, was how a whole new world opened up to me. I realized that having all these extra choices is actually a crutch in that there are too many choices. It's hard to make the right one. The one that's right for that moment."

Keberle says it helped him edit his compositional arranging processes down to the key elements. He also found that it was not uncommon among noted composers. "Stravinsky, in particular, used to talk about the fact that he would try to do similar things and limit himself to literally one device—whether it was a rhythmic or melodic or harmonic devise. He would try to milk that once devise for all it was worth. Sometimes for an entire composition. I stumbled upon that realization in my own way."

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