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Coleman Hawkins

Coleman Hawkins single-handedly brought the saxophone to the prominence in jazz that the instrument enjoys. Before he hit the scene, jazz groups had little use for the instrument. One player (forgot who) said, "with all due respect to Adolph Sax, Coleman Hawkins invented the saxophone." Hawkins, or "Bean", as he was known as, started playing cello at a young age before switching to the saxophone. He was a lifelong listener of classical music, and as a result, his knowledge of music theory was far ahead of his peers. Whereas Louis Armstrong improvised his solos based on the melody, Hawkins based his on the harmony and had a strong sense of rhythm. Hawkins hit New York at the age of 20 and quickly established himself, as he became the star of the Fletcher Henderson band

ARTICLE: BOOK REVIEW

Space Is The Place: The Lives And Times Of Sun Ra

Read "Space Is The Place: The Lives And Times Of Sun Ra" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Space Is The Place: The Lives And Times Of Sun Ra John F. Szwed 512 Pages ISBN: 978-1-4780-0841-5 Duke University Press 2020 Of all the 20th century jazz figures, perhaps only John Coltrane and Miles Davis have achieved greater cult status than Sun Ra. Unlike Coltrane, Ra lived into ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Jeff Rupert/George Garzone: The Ripple

Read "The Ripple" reviewed by Jim Worsley

The Ripple refers to the infectious, warm, intimate, yet big sound developed by the great Lester Young, starting in the late 1930s. While Young pioneered improvisational creativity, Stan Getz later took the baton (well, it was actually a saxophone) and further expanded his idol's stylish approach with new and creatively open-ended visions. Young and Getz collectively ...

ARTICLE: SOCAL JAZZ

George Garzone: Sax In The City

Read "George Garzone: Sax In The City" reviewed by Jim Worsley

George Garzone is not the mayor of the city of Boston. If he was appointed to a position it would more likely be king. He is, at the very least, the toast of the town. This isn't news. King George has reigned with a firm grasp of his mighty tenor saxophone for close to half a ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

The Soul Jazz Guitar of Montgomery, Burrell and Green (1960 - 1965)

Read "The Soul Jazz Guitar of Montgomery, Burrell and Green (1960 - 1965)" reviewed by Russell Perry

Hard bop created a comfortable setting for a suite of great blues-influenced guitar players who led the way toward soul jazz. Several of these players were from the mid-west -Wes Montgomery from Indianapolis, Grant Green from St. Louis and Detroit's Kenny Burrell. The next three hours of Jazz at 100 will present music from the 1960s ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

Free Association - Vol. 2 with Michael Blake

Read "Free Association - Vol. 2 with Michael Blake" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu

Free Association is a series of collaborative mixtapes curated by Mondo Jazz in association with musicians and selectors of various origins. Free Association mixtapes develop as a conversation. The first selector sends a tune cherry-picked to suit, and ideally surprise, the second selector who then, in turn, returns the favor. ...

NEWS: VIDEO / DVD

Lockjaw Meets the Hawk

Lockjaw Meets the Hawk

To the best of my knowledge, tenor saxophonists Eddie “Lockjaw" Davis and Coleman Hawkins recorded together as a duo only once (Very Saxy was a group session with saxophonists Buddy Tate and Arnett Cobb). Davis—like Sonny Rollins, Don Byas, Lucky Thompson and others— was deeply influenced by Hawkins's gruff, boastful attack. So teaming up with his ...

ARTICLE: LIVE REVIEW

Zandra Queen Of Jazz at Smock Alley Theatre

Read "Zandra Queen Of Jazz at Smock Alley Theatre" reviewed by Ian Patterson

Zandra Queen Of Jazz Smock Alley Theatre jny: Dublin, Ireland February 2, 2020 Jazz women are like hen's teeth in general histories of jazz. It took Sally Placksin's Jazz Women 1900 To The Present: Their Words, Lives and Music (Pluto Press, 1985) to acknowledge the contributions of dozens of jazz's ...

ARTICLE: MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Vintage Dolphy

Read "Vintage Dolphy" reviewed by Duncan Heining

Vintage Dolphy appeared originally in 1986/7 on both vinyl and CD. Featuring recordings from three separate live performances from Eric Dolphy, two at Carnegie Hall, both with his own quartet and in two 'third stream' settings devised by Gunther Schuller, the album provided intriguing insights into Dolphy's improvisational skills and approach. Were this not enough, the ...

ARTICLE: UNDER THE RADAR

Tales of The Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed - Jazz Societies, Part II

Read "Tales of The Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed - Jazz Societies, Part II" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Part 1 | Part 2 Jazz Societies, Part 1 briefly traced the preservation and interpretation of jazz from the oral history of its West African roots through academic and cultural institutions. The article included an overview of jazz societies and foundations that further the fostering of jazz education. The organizations vary in scope, size ...


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