3

Kevin Hays: Creative Flow

George Colligan By

Sign in to view read count
And students tend to see these chords as static entities. Like the A7 in that piece, the 13th is always altered. I like to see these chords as a stack of options that ultimately get distilled down to where I just think A Dominant, and you could have both the altered 13th and the natural 13, and hopefully at some point you could have access to all twelve tones of the scale on any given chord. But they have to go through the process of learning the scales

GC: So do you start with scales?

KH: I do, I do! Surprisingly. I used to always get annoyed because people used to always say, " What scale do you play over this chord?" And I would say, "No, what chord are you going to play over this scale?" Pick a scale—if you have to ask that question, you don't know what the sound is. If it's a diminished scale sound, and you are thinking say C, Eb, Gb, A, then you are missing a bunch of other notes. And also if you are thinking a diminished sound is C, E, G, Bb, Db, meaning a C7b9 sound, you are still missing a bunch of notes. What scale are you thinking about? For me, I like to have all the notes laid out in front of me, all 8 or 9 notes, then I can pick and choose what notes I want.

GC: What about the shape of the line and phrasing? What would you say to a student who already knows the scales and chords and needs to make it sound like jazz?

KH: Oftentimes, even though we know the scale, we seem to always go to our comfortable notes. Like we always go to the 9th on the minor 7th chord. I want to get all the notes in the scale to have equal importance, so that you always have the full palette of colors available to you. Sometimes, I will have a student play a chord in the left hand, and then play the chromatic scale against the chord to hear how each note sounds against the chord. I might have them play a major chord and then play the chromatic scale, and so you have b9, 9, #9, 3, 4, etc... so you can hear the relative dissonance with each note against the chord. And then we might do that on a dominant chord, or an altered dominant.

But then what I suggest is, take the first three or four measures of a tune. I then have them play from the top part of the keyboard through the chords and play eighth notes consistently down the keyboard and connect the scales depending on which chord, in this case E-7b5, A7#9#5, C-7, and F7. But if you do it from a different note each time, you end up coming up with some very interesting note choices just using scale tones. Then I have them add one chromatic note in each measure, anywhere in the scale, and that makes for some very beautiful lines. Of course, this is a very systematic way with just eighth notes, but if you start to use different rhythms, and go different directions on the keyboard, you start to have more options than, you know, just your favorite arpeggio on a given chord.

I always wanted to avoid patterns and licks. I got into them for a second, and was sometimes impressed with licks, but I always got bored with those sort of things quickly. The players I liked never sounded like they played licks, they always sounded spontaneous. I liked the guys who surprised me! So that's how I wanted to play. And it's interesting because when you play an exercise like the one I just mentioned, as structured as it is, you are surprised!

GC: Last question: You lived in New York for years, and then you moved out to Santa Fe, New Mexico for a few years. Why did you move out and why did you move back?

KH: I was dealing with some depression issues, some personal issues...I was struggling with that in New York, and I just need to get away for a while and sort that out. I ultimately came back because there was not much of a music scene out in Sante Fe, and my roots are all here so I felt like it was time to come back. But it's something I'm still struggling with—self-searching, trying to find out what's important. How do I live healthfully and creatively, and not lose my shit? As you know, musician's lives are rather unstable. It's still difficult. I haven't been playing much these days. I love playing, of course, but I'm trying to put it together. I feel like most of my growth as a musician has not come from practicing. I remember coming from Sante Fe, where I was not practicing much at all, and I did a gig with Nicholas Payton, and Nicholas said, "Whatever you are doing out there in New Mexico, keep doing it!" Sometimes it's just about getting out of your own way. It's about taking stuff away, rather than adding to it. Getting out of the way of the creative flow. The challenge for me is to not block the creative flow.

GC: But are you happy to be back in New York?

KH: Absolutely, I have some projects coming up, a two piano thing with Brad Mehldau, a performance and recording, and I'm playing some with Tim Ries, and some Indian musicians. It's an abundant time. I'm not touring much, but I'm just thankful that I'm still... playing.

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Bridge Over Troubled Water

Bridge Over Troubled Water

Kevin Hays
You've Got a Friend

Album Reviews
Interviews
Album Reviews
Read more articles
Hope

Hope

Newvelle Records
2017

buy
North

North

Sunnyside Records
2016

buy
New Day

New Day

Sunnyside Records
2015

buy
Variations

Variations

Pirouet Records
2011

buy
Seventh Sense

Seventh Sense

Blue Note Records
2008

buy

Upcoming Shows

Date Detail Price
Oct11Fri
Lionel Loueke, Kevin Hays
Kings Place
London, UK

Related Articles

Read Monty Alexander: Still Rolling Interviews
Monty Alexander: Still Rolling
By Geno Thackara
July 19, 2019
Read Shambhu: Soothing Guitar for Stressful Times Interviews
Shambhu: Soothing Guitar for Stressful Times
By Jakob Baekgaard
July 14, 2019
Read Rick Lawn: The Evolution of Big Band Sounds in America Interviews
Rick Lawn: The Evolution of Big Band Sounds in America
By Victor L. Schermer
July 2, 2019
Read Theo Croker: It's Just Black Music Interviews
Theo Croker: It's Just Black Music
By Keith Henry Brown
June 24, 2019
Read A Young Person's Guide to the Jazz Bastard Podcast Interviews
A Young Person's Guide to the Jazz Bastard Podcast
By Patrick Burnette
June 11, 2019
Read Joey DeFrancesco: From Musical Prodigy to Jazz Icon Interviews
Joey DeFrancesco: From Musical Prodigy to Jazz Icon
By Victor L. Schermer
June 2, 2019
Read Moers Festival Interviews: Marshall Allen Interviews
Moers Festival Interviews: Marshall Allen
By Martin Longley
May 30, 2019