Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

4

Peter Brendler: Message In Motion

David A. Orthmann By

Sign in to view read count
Message In Motion is a recording that can be gainfully approached from a number of angles. You can choose to play it in a single sitting from start to finish, taking in an array of moods evoked by bassist Peter Brendler's seven compositions and a band worthy of his exemplary skills as a writer. (The record also includes selections penned by Duke Ellington, Elliott Smith, and Alice Coltrane.)

Equally satisfying is the practice of detaching the compositions from the improvisations that follow, enabling one to focus on the care Brendler takes in crafting melodies, appreciate the shapes and contours of individual songs, as well as his shrewd employment of different configurations of a five-piece group. It's easy to become fixated on each of his works, and after a while, despite their differences, they loosely cohere into some sort of aggregate. "Splayed" opens in a wistful manner that includes brief silences, and quickly turns harder and somewhat sinister. "Stunts and Twists" is a haunting, quasi-ballad that evolves in a long, restless sweep. Bearing the influence of the early work of Ornette Coleman, the densely swinging "Very Light and Very Sweet" seems to feed on itself. The deliberately paced "Gimmie The Numbers" makes bedfellows of elements ranging from gospel to gutbucket. Fueled by a firestorm of distorted guitar noise and punchy, drum dominated time, "Lucky In Astoria" sounds like a waltz on steroids.

Another rewarding course is concentrating on the work of each of the primary soloists—tenor saxophonist Rich Perry, trumpeter Peter Evans, guitarist Ben Monder, and Brendler—and making note of the ways in which the bassist and drummer Vinnie Sperrazza support and interact with them. As his tone declares a slightly sour disposition, Perry's "Didn't Do Nothing" solo sounds as if he's pushing away some sort of obstacle without using a whole lot of force or emphasis, as if the effort is distasteful or futile to begin with. In general, his improvising is slippery, evasive, and—miraculously—right down the center of the music's core. Throughout Evans' wildly ambitious improvisations on "Splayed," "Stunts and Twists," and "Didn't Do Nothing," each note seems to be gobbled up by the next one, offering the impression of something being torn down and reassembled in a different form, all in one maniacal, continuous motion. Taking his cue from the song's melody, during "Gimmie The Numbers," Monder begins in a simple, direct manner, and eventually turns prickly, making darting leaps across the beat. During the incendiary "Lucky In Astoria," his overwrought guitar and Perry's tenor extemporize at the same time, as if they're both trying to force their way out of a confined space by vastly different means.

It's entirely possible that there's no end to the discoveries and pleasures engendered by Message In Motion. The music always encourages yet another listen. Highly recommended.

Track Listing: Splayed; Angelica; Stunts And Twists; Ptah The El Daoud; Easy Way Out; Very Light And Very Sweet; Gimme The Numbers; Didn't Do Nothing; Lucky In Astoria; Stop Gap.

Personnel: Peter Brendler: bass; Rich Perry: tenor saxophone; Peter Evans: trumpet; Vinnie Sperrazza: drums; Ben Monder: guitar.

Title: Message In Motion | Year Released: 2016 | Record Label: Posi-Tone Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Album Reviews
Read more articles
Message In Motion

Message In Motion

Posi-Tone Records
2016

buy
Outside The Line

Outside The Line

Posi-Tone Records
2014

buy
The Angle Below

The Angle Below

SteepleChase Records
2013

buy

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Paint The Sky Album Reviews
Paint The Sky
By Andrew J. Sammut
February 21, 2019
Read God Is More Than Love Can Ever Be Album Reviews
God Is More Than Love Can Ever Be
By Karl Ackermann
February 21, 2019
Read Rhyme And Reason Album Reviews
Rhyme And Reason
By Mark Corroto
February 21, 2019
Read The Definition of Insanity Album Reviews
The Definition of Insanity
By Nicholas F. Mondello
February 21, 2019
Read Omhu Album Reviews
Omhu
By Jakob Baekgaard
February 21, 2019
Read In Between the Tumbling a Stillness Album Reviews
In Between the Tumbling a Stillness
By Karl Ackermann
February 20, 2019
Read Gary Album Reviews
Gary
By Dan McClenaghan
February 20, 2019