Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

6

Lauren Kinsella: In Between Every Line

Ian Patterson By

Sign in to view read count
There's a lot of really exceptional music going on in Dublin, in Ireland right now, and the media should be telling people about it in an informed way. —Lauren Kinsella
It may be that the voice is the most difficult instrument to improvise with, judging by the relatively small number of improvising vocalists out there. Jazz singers who scat are common enough, but only the best are able to breathe life into a style that has become rather formulaic over the past century. Lauren Kinsella (the stress lies on the first syllable) is one singer who is boldly carving out her own path as an improvising vocalist. The London-based Irish singer is making a name for herself in improvising circles on both sides of the Irish Sea, and the release of two distinct and highly absorbing CDs in 2012, with more to come in 2013, will no doubt help to spread the name of this highly talented individual. The first of these releases, All This Talk About (WideEar Records, 2012), introduces Kinsella's arresting improvisations in a duo recording with Swiss drummer Alex Huber. Adventurous syllabic and non-syllabic utterances and a heightened rhythmic sensibility are accompanied by Kinsella's more conventional and quite beautifully sung words. Three numbers inspired by poet Ted Hughes' "Thought-Fox" form the backbone of the album—a daring collaborative effort that amply rewards those who look for a bit of edge and innovation in their music.

Hughes' poem also provides the name of one of Kinsella's bands, the quintet Thought-Fox, and its debut recording, My Guess (Diatribe Records, 2012) is another impressive statement. Inevitably, given the group format of vocals, trombone, piano, drums and bass, there's more of a conventional—though utterly contemporary—jazz-group feel to the music than in the free play of All This Talk About, and a great part of the album's appeal lies in the sophisticated melodic and rhythmic interplay. An improviser Kinsella surely is, but My Guess also highlights her compositional strengths and her ability to create a fine balance between the two disciplines.

Kinsella's talent for singing was spotted at an early age by one of her teachers in Dublin, and good guidance at that early stage got the budding young singer off to a great start. Her parents, however, must have had an inkling that their daughter would take to music. "My parents sent me there specifically because they knew it was a good school for music," relates Kinsella. "When I was 12, I did a school concert; I can still remember it," Kinsella laughs. "There was this lovely woman in the audience who happened to be the singing teacher, and she came up to me afterwards and said, 'You have a nice voice, but your posture is terrible, and we'll need to work on that.' I started getting singing lessons with her. I learned how to sing, and my technique was firmly embedded."

Kinsella studied the classical repertoire, from Haydn and Benjamin Britten to Handel: "I always got the solo singer's role," recalls Kinsella. "I loved being in choirs, and I was always up in front, trying to watch somebody direct sound. I was very interested in that." Kinsella's parents must take some of the credit for steering her to a music-oriented school in the first place, and although neither of her parents had a musical background, they were both influential in other ways in shaping their daughter's future direction. "My Mum and my Nan [grandmother] have lovely voices. I definitely get it from that side of the family," says Kinsella. Kinsella's father provided Kinsella with another sort of gift. "My Dad owns a bookshop. We always worked at the bookshop when we were kids," Kinsella explains. "I worked in the second-hand department, and you'd open a box of books and get to look at people's lives. We read a lot and always had second-hand books around. I collected a lot of poetry books and biographical books about authors."

In a sense, her father's bookshop would become a laboratory for the singer. "All the work I do now in improvisation and the texts that I use and base my work on all come from that source," she acknowledges. "When I started getting into free improvisation, I'd bring books along, using pieces at random, pieces of poetry, and it would come out in the sessions in my writing. I like improvising with poems because the very nature of their structure lends itself to music. Visual imagery is a very strong tool for a singer—we can't see our instrument, per se, so we have to use our mind's eye. I look at some words or passages, and it jumps back at me as sound. This could be in a letter, in a poem, in anything, really. It excites me, and I want to sing through it, play through it, understand the words and their meaning through music."

Tags

Watch

comments powered by Disqus

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Interviews
Matt Davis: Big Family, Big Picture
By Dan Bilawsky
March 21, 2019
Interviews
Casey Benjamin: EclectRic Expressionism
By Barbara Ina Frenz
March 6, 2019
Interviews
Cooper-Moore: Catharsis and Creation in Community Spirit
By Jakob Baekgaard
February 26, 2019
Interviews
Susanna Risberg: Bold As Love
By Ian Patterson
February 25, 2019
Interviews
David Crosby: A Revitalized Creativity
By Mike Jacobs
January 22, 2019
Interviews
Chuck Deardorf: Hanging On To The Groove
By Paul Rauch
January 19, 2019