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Jazz Articles about Sam Newsome

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Book Review

Be Inspired, Stay Focused: Creativity, Learning, and the Business of Music

Read "Be Inspired, Stay Focused: Creativity, Learning, and the Business of Music" reviewed by David A. Orthmann


Be Inspired, Stay Focused: Creativity, Learning, and the Business of Music Sam Newsome 146 Pages ISBN: #978-1-09835-231-8 Some New Press 2022 Sam Newsome offers an abundance of ideas, concepts, and guidance throughout Be Inspired, Stay Focused: Creativity, Learning, and the Business of Music. Some of them, like “The Benefits of Slow Practice" and “Ten Reasons You Might Have Trouble with Rhythm," are helpful, somewhat conventional pieces of wisdom that are likely to benefit ...

2

Album Review

SN Trio: Free Wyoming

Read "Free Wyoming" reviewed by Mike Jurkovic


There is a lot of movie going on: The night boatman at the moors, fifty foot ants, a crisis in chaos, gulls, babies, dark climes, eccentric mimes . . . Whatever you can fancy while listening to the unruly codes of saxophonist Sam Newsome and his equally idiosyncratic, first-time rhythm section of bassist Matt Smiley and drummer/percussionist Ron Coulter is happening, whether you can follow it or not, within the challenging realm of Free Wyoming. Recorded live in ...

4

Album Review

Sam Newsome and Jean-Michel Pilc: Magic Circle

Read "Magic Circle" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian


Intimate, innovative and captivating Magic Circle is an album of duets between soprano saxophonist Sam Newsome and pianist Jean-Michel Pilc. Although they perform primarily standards their interpretations are anything but conventional. Both musicians are known for their individual styles and singular approaches to improvisation and they showcase these superbly on the current disc.Pianist and bandleader Duke Ellington's “In a Sentimental Mood" opens with almost baroque refrains of Newsome's rich, meditative saxophone. Pilc's tolling piano provides a dark undertone. ...

19

Album Review

Sam Newsome: Sopranoville: New Works for the Prepared and Non-Prepared Saxophone

Read "Sopranoville: New Works for the Prepared and Non-Prepared Saxophone" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


On his fifth solo soprano album, Sopranoville: New Works for the Prepared and Non-prepared Saxophone, Sam Newsome continues to explore and extend the utility of his instrument. This new release takes yet another new direction for Newsome whose previous solo outing The Straight Horn of Africa: A Path to Liberation/Art of the Soprano, Vol. 2 (Self-produced, 2014) provided an aural link to Africa, evoking the soul and vitality of the continent. Here, as on Art of the Soprano, Vol. 1 ...

50

Album Review

Sam Newsome: The Straight Horn of Africa: A Path to Liberation

Read "The Straight Horn of Africa: A Path to Liberation" reviewed by Karl Ackermann


Sam Newsome's The Straight Horn of Africa: A Path to Liberation (subtitled “Art of the Soprano, Vol. 2") is--despite the chronology--the fourth solo outing by the alto/tenor-turned-soprano saxophonist. The self-produced Monk Abstractions (2007) and Blue Soliloquy (2009) were highly regarded entries that preceded The Art of the Soprano, Vol. 1 (2012). The latter album saw Newsome using layering techniques that allowed him to add a percussion element effectively derived from tapping keys. To suit the objectives of The ...

7

Album Review

Sam Newsome: The Straight Horn of Africa: A Path to Liberation

Read "The Straight Horn of Africa: A Path to Liberation" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


Sam Newsome played tenor saxophone in trumpeter Terence Blanchard's group back in the early 90s, but he put away the tenor late a few years later and left his soprano saxophone out on the table. The plan was to explore the possibilities of “the straight horn." Then Gerry Teekan, producer and founder of Criss Cross Records, advised Newsome that the soprano horn was a very limited instrument. That observation was, fortunately, not taken to heart. The Straight Horn ...

2

Album Review

Sam Newsome: The Art of the Soprano, Vol. 1

Read "The Art of the Soprano, Vol. 1" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan


Sam Newsome's The Art of the Soprano, Vol. 1 is a solo soprano saxophone outing, While not unprecedented--Steve Lacy and Evan Parker have done this before--it certainly is unusual. The straight horn all alone: no bass, no drums, no piano or guitar. Sounds lonely, and a little too sonically spare.But no one has gone deeper into solo soprano than Newsome. The saxophonist, who honed his artist chops in trumpeter Terence Blanchard's groups on tenor sax in the early ...


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