Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

110

Side A: A New Margin

Mark Corroto By

Sign in to view read count
It is quite rare to hear multi-reedist Ken Vandermark record or perform with a pianist, the reason being that, back in the day (the early 1990s), his brand of new Chicago jazz was presented much like the hardcore punk scene of the previous decade—out of the back of a van. Like Henry Rollins and Black Flag, Vandermark's life was one of constant travel, setting up and breaking down, only to move on to the next show.

Needless to say, his nomadic lifestyle was not conducive to trucking a piano around.

One of the few exceptions to the piano rule has been Norwegian Håvard Wiik—one-third of the chamber jazz trio Free Fall with Vandermark and bassist Ingebrigt Håker Flaten and a guest on Vandermark 5's The Horse Jumps and The Ship Is Gone (Not Two, 2010).

Wiik's role in Side A, like that in his band Atomic, is to relieve Vandermark of his organizational role---order being a natural habit for a chordal instrument. With the saxophonist and drummer Chad Taylor, Wiik also shares in the songwriting, making A New Margin an invigorating take on the jazz trio.

Freed of the responsibility for song structure, Vandermark can focus on being a soloist. His tenor (and the occasional clarinet) tone is liberated, and sounds quite liberating. With Taylor's drums chasing Wiik's hammering piano for the first three minutes of "What Is Is," the saxophonist marches in response to the call. He sings the songs on this record, balanced and supported by Wiik and Taylor.

This trio also stabilizes this music without a bassist. The dynamic Taylor, best known for his work with the various Chicago Underground bands and the Exploding Star Orchestra, provides a constant energy here, maintaining a noisily free sound on "Fold" or supporting the abstractions of "Arborization" and "Permanent Sleeve (Walking Hand)." The session mixes the outward avant with some swinging bop-centered swing, even delving into {{Phillip Glass}|-like territory on Wiik's "The Kreuzberg Variations," building upon a repeating structure, only to be destroyed by entropy—sweet, free jazz entropy.

Track Listing: Boxer; What Is Is; Trued Right; Fold; Arborization; Enclilies; The Kreuzberg Variations; Comeing; Permanent Sleeve (Walking Hand); Giacometti.

Personnel: Ken Vandermark: tenor saxophone, clarinet; Håvard Wiik: piano; Chad Taylor: drums.

Title: A New Margin | Year Released: 2012 | Record Label: Clean Feed Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop for Music

Start your music shopping from All About Jazz and you'll support us in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Higher Album Reviews
Higher
By Tyran Grillo
May 26, 2019
Read The Unlonely Raindancer Album Reviews
The Unlonely Raindancer
By Matt Parker
May 26, 2019
Read Pyramid Scheme Album Reviews
Pyramid Scheme
By Mark Sullivan
May 26, 2019
Read Mosaismic Album Reviews
Mosaismic
By Mike Jurkovic
May 26, 2019
Read Caldera / Sky Islands Album Reviews
Caldera / Sky Islands
By Jakob Baekgaard
May 25, 2019
Read Baby, Please Come Home Album Reviews
Baby, Please Come Home
By Doug Collette
May 25, 2019
Read Reckless Heart Album Reviews
Reckless Heart
By Doug Collette
May 25, 2019