9

TONICA 2013

TONICA 2013
Emilie Pons By

Sign in to view read count
TONICA
Guada Expo Conference
Guadalajara, Mexico
August 1-11, 2013
Jazz freaks exist everywhere, Mexico included. Although Guadalajara has no official jazz club, it does have TONICA, a not-for-profit organization and foundation that helps the local youth of and around Guadalajara, and promotes jazz music—or, more generally speaking, improvised music. TONICA, which is an intelligent reference to the tonic, the most important note in a musical piece, seems on its way to powerful social and artistic change in the state of Jalisco.
TONICA was started in 2006 by trumpeter Gilberto Cervantes and singer Sara Valenzuela, both Mexicans who used to be part of the funk band La Dosis (the Dose). This year, from August 1-11, the foundation organized its first major encuentro (congress). It consisted of a series of master classes, workshops, discussions of creative or improvised music, roundtables and concerts.

Major American jazz musicians performed, among them Kurt Elling, Nicholas Payton, Kenny Garrett and Joey DeFrancesco, but so did Mexican bands like Mole (pronounced MOH-lay) and Troker, whose lead trumpeter is Cervantes (who finished his Berklee studies in 2004). Another trumpeter, Brian Lynch, is the director of the TONICA Ensemble, which features students from the foundation, including saxophonist Gerry Lopez, guitarist Nacho Alcantara and chromatic harmonicist Angelberto.

The congress (or summit) incorporated a local jazz and blues festival, seminars, discussions and concerts (some of which were part of the off festival, Festival Alterno) in various venues—Guada Expo (where the International Guadalajara book fair also takes place), Cafe Rojo, the Degollado theater, Candela, Matera Bar, the museum MURA, the Journalism Museum (The House of the Dogs)—with artists like Nicholas Payton, Ben Allison and Jay Rodriguez.

This year's festival was thus about playing music, listening to music, teaching music (Arturo O'Farrill taught classes to younger students), learning music and learning about music, talking about jazz and jazz journalism, writing about jazz, broadcasting jazz and watching jazz movies, since TONICA also organized a music film series. Yes, the jazz scene in Mexico is still new and still needs to organize itself, but TONICA certainly brings hope.

"This time it's really big," said Mexican pianist Mark Aanderud, who was invited to teach and perform at the conference. "They have a lot of events, all those talks.... it changed a lot in the sense that [there are] so many concerts, so many people coming—really a lot of people coming. And I think the new thing is that they have all the different sides of jazz in Mexico here. Not just the teachers, but also the media... people talking about it... which is great."

Nathalie Braux, a French clarinetist/saxophonist based in Guadalajara who performed at the encuentra—and took the workshop TONICA organized with saxophonist Bob Sheppard in 2010—said she has "always been appreciating what either Sara Valenzuela or Gilberto Cervantes have been doing in terms of the promotion of jazz in Guadalajara, which is a city where jazz is not part of the culture." Braux explained that, in Guadalajara, jazz is "just something that is developing, but it's not yet something totally developed or totally 'normal.' Sara has worked as director of the radio program called Solo Jazz for almost 21 years now, ans Gil also has been developing something like a jazz big band."

Braux also described the way jazz can be perceived in Mexico: "Curiously, though in other places they might think that jazz was popular music and linked to brothels, now it is more elegant. It is considered like an intellectual music. Also blues. Just because it is unusual, different and supposedly elevated." But Braux also said she was confident that "TONICA is going to grow."



Diego Escobar, who works for the Jalisco Ministry of Culture and who used to play the drums with Cervantes, explained why the Ministry of Culture supports TONICA: "TONICA is a fabulously ambitious project that does not restrict itself to concerts; it has a very serious educational foundation. TONICA has always maintained an education line. And on the other side, the professional side (with the industry perspective), that the festival is engaging with, is very much something the Ministry of Culture appreciates because it contributes to the city's growing professional musicians' community. And that's very important for us."

Referring to the congress, Escobar added: "This is the most ambitious program yet by TONICA. I would hope that this becomes something that the city expects. And I would like to see that in ten years TONICA will have developed a permanent educational project because that is something the city still lacks."

Related Video

Shop

More Articles

Read Panama Jazz Festival 2017 Live Reviews Panama Jazz Festival 2017
by Mark Holston
Published: February 21, 2017
Read Foundation of Funk at Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom Live Reviews Foundation of Funk at Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom
by Geoff Anderson
Published: February 20, 2017
Read The Cookers at Nighttown Live Reviews The Cookers at Nighttown
by C. Andrew Hovan
Published: February 16, 2017
Read Monty Alexander Trio at Longwood Gardens Live Reviews Monty Alexander Trio at Longwood Gardens
by Geno Thackara
Published: February 15, 2017
Read "Brian Charette/Jim Alfredson Organ Duo at Nighttown" Live Reviews Brian Charette/Jim Alfredson Organ Duo at Nighttown
by C. Andrew Hovan
Published: October 26, 2016
Read "Sons of Kemet at Black Box, Belfast" Live Reviews Sons of Kemet at Black Box, Belfast
by Ian Patterson
Published: April 12, 2016
Read "Jon Cleary at The Ardmore Music Hall" Live Reviews Jon Cleary at The Ardmore Music Hall
by Mike Jacobs
Published: September 25, 2016
Read "T Sisters at SFJAZZ" Live Reviews T Sisters at SFJAZZ
by Asher Wolf
Published: July 21, 2016
Read "Mary Ellen Desmond: Comfort and Joy Concert 2016" Live Reviews Mary Ellen Desmond: Comfort and Joy Concert 2016
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: December 17, 2016

Post a comment

comments powered by Disqus

Sponsor: Jazz Near You | GET IT  

Support our sponsor

Support All About Jazz's Future

We need your help and we have a deal. Contribute $20 and we'll hide the six Google ads that appear on every page for a full year!

Buy it!