13

Roxy Coss: Standing Out

Paul Rauch By

Sign in to view read count
I think jazz is so important. The whole idea of it is the best of what our culture could represent. It’s the best of democracy, and America, and diversity, everybody having a voice. —Roxy Coss
All About Jazz: You have recently released a new CD, Chasing the Unicorn (Posi-Tone, 2017), just a year after the release of Restless Idealism (Origin, 2016). Albums are like a snapshot of a timeframe, how has that musical image changed in a year?

Roxy Coss: More back story is it was recorded more than a year apart, even though they were released a year apart, so there was actually more time between recordings, almost two years. When I worked with Jeremy Pelt, he taught me a lot about the industry. His release schedule is every year, and I saw that really work for him, so that's my goal right now, to continue now that I have the momentum going. From my experience, I've seen how important it is to keep getting contact out there, regardless of what it is. The more stuff you put out there, the more chances of someone hearing you.

What changed is I started a working band. Restless Idealism was more people I was playing with a lot at Smoke for years, that being Chris Pattishall and Alex Wintz. We didn't really have a consistent bassist and drummer for that band. I had been on the road with Jeremy, and with Willie Jones. Willie was like a hero for me when I moved to New York. Dezron Douglas was on that tour as well. I had played with Willie and Dezron together, so I wanted them on the record. That was that record, we never played anywhere together as a band, ever.

Once I recorded that, I realized I wanted more of a consistent band, to be able to work on stuff to get a sound. Every time I performed, I was rehearsing a new set of band members, so you can only get so deep with the music. As good as they are, if you want to try out different things compositionally, it's hard when you're teaching the music each time to new people.

I got a new residency in 2016 at Club Bonafide. For that, I tried to commit to a band lineup, trying out a bunch of different drummers and different bass players. This is the band I ended up with for Chasing the Unicorn. We played at Newport together, we recorded together, and did a bunch of gigs in the fall. So I felt like for the first time, I had a band. They were all younger musicians, maybe a little less known. For me, musically, it allowed me more freedom to try things out. I was trying things out in a different way.

AAJ: You mentioned having different drummers and bass players. When soloing, isn't the bass and percussion ultimately what you're listening to?

RC: Yes. It's also about reading. I like to do interesting things, so I need them to be able to read quickly and accurately what I'm writing. I write in a lot of different styles. I need the drummer, and the bassist as well to understand my influences pretty well, which are very diverse. Jimmy McBride on drums is the most fluent reader, and is very well versed.

AAJ: And very young as well.

RC: Yes. Also what is great with Jimmy, I feel like he's growing with me. Every time we play, he brings something new, more to it, more energy, he's growing into himself feeling more comfortable to really try things in the band, which is cool.

AAJ: Your quintet set up has guitar replacing trumpet on your past two records. What inspired this particular lineup?

RC: I had a quintet with trumpet for a couple years. On my first self released record Kate Miller was playing trumpet. When I was younger, we had a residency at a restaurant in my neighborhood, we would play every Monday. So I had that sound when I started writing. When I had the Smoke residency, I hadn't played my music in awhile, as I had been touring with Jeremy Pelt. At first, I was just doing quartet standards for a long time. Then I thought, 'Why don't I use this to try to come up with a concept.'

At the time, Kate had moved out of town, and there weren't any young trumpet players that I was playing with. So I thought to myself that if I'm not using trumpet, what do I want to do? I was really listening to a lot of Kurt Rosenwinkel, and Mark Turner stuff at that time, and I thought that could be cool. I was playing a lot of gigs with Alex Wintz, with a different band leader, so we were friends, and I really liked his playing. I thought. 'Why don't I just try this and see what happens?' I really liked the freedom it gave me to either double the melody, counter melodies, or textural, two chordal instruments playing at once. There's more flexibility there.

Another thing about the trumpet. When you have a trumpet-tenor front line, it really implies a certain thing. It has a nostalgia to it, which is great. But I think that the guitar created more freedom for me in terms of what people are going to attach and associate with the sound.

AAJ: So you're saying that with a trumpet-tenor front line, people are going to look at the trumpet player as the leader?

RC: That's another part of it. Just that sound is more of a classic, it's more sentimental for people. It's reminiscent of a time past, and I wanted to think of the future, what is the future sound, where the music is going. I'm so influenced by that sound, I didn't want it to box me in to stay there. I wanted to see where I can go. The personality thing too, most trumpet players are very dominant personalities. To find a trumpet player who isn't going to try to lead my band would be a challenge (laughter).

Tags

Related Video

comments powered by Disqus

More Articles

Read Pat Metheny: Driving Forces Interview Pat Metheny: Driving Forces
by Ian Patterson
Published: November 10, 2017
Read Bill Anschell: Curiosity and Invention Interview Bill Anschell: Curiosity and Invention
by Paul Rauch
Published: November 9, 2017
Read Tomas Fujiwara: The More the Better Interview Tomas Fujiwara: The More the Better
by Troy Dostert
Published: November 6, 2017
Read Roxy Coss: Standing Out Interview Roxy Coss: Standing Out
by Paul Rauch
Published: October 22, 2017
Read Jamie Saft: Jazz in the Key of Iggy Interview Jamie Saft: Jazz in the Key of Iggy
by Luca Canini
Published: October 20, 2017
Read "Pat Metheny: Driving Forces" Interview Pat Metheny: Driving Forces
by Ian Patterson
Published: November 10, 2017
Read "Walter Smith III: Jazz Explorer" Interview Walter Smith III: Jazz Explorer
by R.J. DeLuke
Published: April 19, 2017
Read "Arto Lindsay: Watch Out Madames!" Interview Arto Lindsay: Watch Out Madames!
by Enrico Bettinello
Published: April 25, 2017
Read "Lwanda Gogwana: Tradition and Innovation" Interview Lwanda Gogwana: Tradition and Innovation
by Seton Hawkins
Published: September 9, 2017
Read "Remembering Milt Jackson" Interview Remembering Milt Jackson
by Lazaro Vega
Published: March 27, 2017
Read "Eri Yamamoto: The Poet’s Touch" Interview Eri Yamamoto: The Poet’s Touch
by Jakob Baekgaard
Published: May 20, 2017

Join the staff. Writers Wanted!

Develop a column, write album reviews, cover live shows, or conduct interviews.

Please support out sponsor