Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

255

Kenny Barron: Peruvian Blue

Douglas Payne By

Sign in to view read count
Peruvian Blue is Kenny Barron's second solo outing, coming right after 1973's marvelous Sunset To Dawn (released by 32 Jazz last year as part of the two-disc set Soft Spoken Here ). Originally released by Muse Records in 1974, this six-song program finds Barron shifting between electric and acoustic pianos in a variety of groupings, from solo to duo and trio to sextet.

Barron solos with grand passion on acoustic piano for the standard, "Here's That Rainy Day," then duets with recently-deceased guitarist Ted Dunbar on the stylistic "Blue Monk." He then shows off his well-known trio interplay style with bassist David Williams and drummer Albert Heath on the elegant Barron original "The Procession."

Finally, the leader switches to electric piano and adds percussionists Richard Landrum and Sonny Morgan for three of Barron's electric originals: "Peruvian Blue," "Two Areas" and the appealingly funky "In the Meantime." While the ten-minute "Peruvian Blue" is stifled by too much percussion and its Chick Corea / Return To Forever influence, "Two Areas" reveals Barron's compositional abilities, his nice touch on electric piano and, especially, Dunbar's electric sensitivity.

Peruvian Blue has much to offer casual jazz listeners and "Two Areas," "The Procession" and "Blue Monk," especially, provide required listening for fans of both Kenny Barron and Ted Dunbar.

But it would have been more satisfying to hear any one of these different groupings tackle the whole program, rather than having each get sectioned off for a performance or two. Still, Kenny Barron – who has recorded nearly dozen times as a leader since the early 80s – always makes music worth hearing. Peruvian Blue is no exception.

Personnel: Kenny Barron: piano, electric piano, clavinet; Ted Dunbar: guitar; David Williams: bass, electric bass; Richard Landrum: congas, percussion; Sonny Morgan: percussion; Albert Heath: drums.

Tracks:Peruvian Blue; Blue Monk; The Procession; Two Area; Here's That Rainy Day; In The Meantime.

Title: Peruvian Blue | Year Released: 1998 | Record Label: 32 Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Upcoming Shows

Date Detail Price
Mar23Sat
Kenny Barron
Walt Disney Concert Hall
Los Angeles, CA

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Barriers Album Reviews
Barriers
By Karl Ackermann
February 16, 2019
Read Fractal Guitar Album Reviews
Fractal Guitar
By John Kelman
February 16, 2019
Read The Early Bird Gets Album Reviews
The Early Bird Gets
By Mark Corroto
February 16, 2019
Read The Newest Sound You Never Heard Album Reviews
The Newest Sound You Never Heard
By Jerome Wilson
February 16, 2019
Read Think Big: Like Me Album Reviews
Think Big: Like Me
By Paul Naser
February 16, 2019
Read Melodic Ornette Coleman: Piano Works XIII Album Reviews
Melodic Ornette Coleman: Piano Works XIII
By Karl Ackermann
February 15, 2019
Read Free Fall Album Reviews
Free Fall
By Peter Hoetjes
February 15, 2019