Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

374

Gwigwi Mrwebi: Mbaqanga Songs

Chris May By

Sign in to view read count
Recorded in 1967, during the bloody heyday of apartheid South Africa, the joyful, defiant, easy-swinging jazz-jive heard on Mbaqanga Songs was then the recreational soundtrack of the country's black and coloured urban poor. After almost forty years off the shelves—and with impeccable synchronicity—the album was reissued late last month, just days before the death of P.W. Botha, the last hardline racist president of the country.

Made in London by a sextet which included four of the leading South African musicians in exile, the album was originally released as Kwela By Gwigwi's Band. Mbaqanga was considered too taxing a word for native British record buyers to master, so kwela—which, strictly speaking, applies to the pennywhistle jive of the 1950s—was used instead. But in Xhosa, kwela means "get moving," and that's appropriate enough.

Whatever it's called, the music is irresistible—still vibrant and alive forty years on. It's a mixture of Earl Bostic, Charlie Parker, the Skatalites, calypso, Louis Jordan, Horace Silver and a shed load of dagga. Each of the sixteen tracks lasts about three minutes, built around a simple, riff-based—and often very pretty—theme played by the three saxophones in close harmony. Each track includes one or two brief solos, more thematic variations than full-out improvisations. Most are by alto saxophonists Gwigwi Mrwebi and Dudu Pukwana, a handful are by pianist Chris McGregor, and one is by tenor saxophonist Ronnie Beer.

Mrwebi exiled himself in London in 1961, jumping ship (and so forfeiting his South African "citizenship") from the cast of the township musical King Kong. Pukwana, McGregor and Beer arrived in 1965. Collectively, the musicians were the core of the more jazz-oriented Blue Notes and, later, Brotherhood of Breath bands, and mbaqanga was something they played to remind themselves of home. Mrwebi died in 1973, but Pukwana went on to lead the fabulous township jazz band Spear, keeping the mbaqanga flame alive in London until his own passing in 1990.

Mbaqanga saxophone jive is essentially group music—one band under a groove, never deviating far from the beat or the topline. Because it was instrumental, it was considered non-subversive by the apartheid regime, and was allowed to flourish on black radio—further proof of the stupidity of racists. It's simple and unadorned, speaking equally to the heart and the feet. It makes you feel good to be alive, which is why apartheid's victims loved it so much. And if you've read this far, it's practically guaranteed to float your boat.


Track Listing: Good News; Nyusamkhaya; Lily Express; Rough Deal; Kwazakhele; Mini Mthembo; Hayini Bo; Nick Thethe; Mra; Kweleentonga; Botyana; Ndaqmbayo; Zangomva; Zonbongo; Keleketle; Ezindongeni.

Personnel: Gwigwi Mrwebi, Dudu Pukwana: alto saxophone; Ronnie Beer: tenor saxophone; Chris McGregor: piano; Coleridge Goode: bass; Laurie Allan: drums.

Title: Mbaqanga Songs | Year Released: 2006 | Record Label: Honest Jons Records

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read In Between the Tumbling a Stillness Album Reviews
In Between the Tumbling a Stillness
By Karl Ackermann
February 20, 2019
Read Gary Album Reviews
Gary
By Dan McClenaghan
February 20, 2019
Read Perception Album Reviews
Perception
By Paul Rauch
February 20, 2019
Read I Love the Rhythm in a Riff Album Reviews
I Love the Rhythm in a Riff
By Mackenzie Horne
February 20, 2019
Read Head First Album Reviews
Head First
By Roger Farbey
February 20, 2019
Read New American Songbooks, Volume 2 Album Reviews
New American Songbooks, Volume 2
By Karl Ackermann
February 19, 2019
Read Live At JazzCase Album Reviews
Live At JazzCase
By Troy Dostert
February 19, 2019