All About Jazz

Home » Articles » Interviews

Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

7

Jonathan Rowden: Group Identity

Paul Naser By

Sign in to view read count
The Los Angeles jazz scene has no shortage of prodigious talent; on any given night throughout the sprawling landscape that makes up the greater Los Angeles area there is always some exciting happening or unique event, and one is often hard-up to make a decision about where to spend their evening. There are musicians who established themselves years ago, young men and women just arriving on the scene and everything in between. All of it makes the thriving community of musicians an exciting one to be a part of and follow. The young tenor saxophonist Jonathan Rowden definitely belongs to this society. Spending much of his life studying and performing in Southern California, he recently formed a group dedicated to playing original music, The Jonathan Rowden Group, who debuted this January at Vitello's Jazz & Supper Club.

Rowden was born in Los Angeles, but moved to Seattle when he was still quite young. It was here that he first encountered the saxophone. "My dad is a musician, and he plays guitar and sings and writes songs. I think I messed around with his keyboards and guitars when I was a little kid, but when we were in Seattle he was recording, I think it was his second album, and he had a saxophonist from the pacific northwest, named Richard Cole there. He was a great saxophonist, and, looking back, he actually sounded a lot like Michael Brecker. Anyway, I heard him in the garage playing, and I remember going out to the garage and asking him if he could teach me how to play the saxophone, so I guess I really liked the sound of it. So I started learning saxophone when I was about 7 years old. I took lessons for a year, maybe less, and then it was right after that we moved and I never took lessons again until I started college."

Returning to Southern California, Rowden continued to play even though he was no longer taking formal lessons, while also pursuing many other creative interests; "Yeah I was always creative. I was really interested in visual arts for a while, and sometime in high school when I got my first saxophone, like actually got my own, it actually piqued my interest a little bit more. The high school band I was playing with at the time had a bunch of arrangements of like Buddy Rich and that was pretty fun, and that was the first time I heard John Coltrane, my dad got me the album."

The diversity of his musical interests and long time love of music illuminate the inspiration for his unique style and approach to composition. "My dad was really into Steps Ahead, so I think I heard Michael Brecker a lot. My sax teacher in Seattle sounded kind of like Brecker, and we had his album that we played at the house all the time. There were a lot of different musical styles; I was really into movie soundtracks, stuff like that. There was always an element of jazz within all the different music that was being played at the house. If not jazz, music that was really influenced by jazz. My parents were really into Sting, so they had all these Sting albums and I didn't realize how hip some of it was until much later. But I think it kind of attuned my ear , so when I started to hear other jazz, I started to really dig into it. I was also influenced a lot by other styles of music. I went through periods where I was listening to The Smashing Pumpkins, Nirvana and Radiohead kind of stuff. Mostly rock, and actually I listened to a lot of hip hop in middle school and early high school and also classical music throughout the whole thing."

Some of his many influences on his individual compositional and improvisational voice include Pat Metheny, John Coltrane, Hank Mobley, Ben Wendel, Eric Dolphy, Joshua Redman and Craig Taborn, among a great many others. There is a wide variety to his musical tastes, and he says, "I like everything; if it's really accessible and it's beautiful then I like it, if it's really abstract and it's really out there, it still resonates with me. It doesn't have to be within a certain sub genre, in jazz or even in some other style of music, I think compositions that resonate with me are things that are really authentic and genuine." Aside from listening to many types of music, Rowden also studied and continues to study many styles of music.

He received his undergraduate degree in classical saxophone from Vanguard University and continued his education, getting his master's degree in Jazz Studies from California State University Fullerton. "In terms of composing, when I was studying 20th century music in college, and when I was in graduate school, when I got to study a little more in depth about the baroque era and early classical music and late romantic, I got really into the style of composing where you're trying to get a lot out of a little bit of material."

Tags

Related Video

comments powered by Disqus

Related Articles

Read Linley Hamilton: Strings Attached Interviews
Linley Hamilton: Strings Attached
by Ian Patterson
Published: April 17, 2018
Read Camille Bertault: Unity in Diversity Interviews
Camille Bertault: Unity in Diversity
by Ludovico Granvassu
Published: April 10, 2018
Read Chad Taylor: Myths and Music Education Interviews
Chad Taylor: Myths and Music Education
by Jakob Baekgaard
Published: April 9, 2018
Read Fabian Almazan: Multilayered Vision Interviews
Fabian Almazan: Multilayered Vision
by Angelo Leonardi
Published: March 30, 2018
Read Ryuichi Sakamoto: Naturally Born to Seek Diversity Interviews
Ryuichi Sakamoto: Naturally Born to Seek Diversity
by Nenad Georgievski
Published: March 27, 2018
Read Leonardo Pavkovic: Nothing is Ordinary Interviews
Leonardo Pavkovic: Nothing is Ordinary
by Chris M. Slawecki
Published: March 16, 2018
Read "The indefatigable Bill Frisell" Interviews The indefatigable Bill Frisell
by Mario Calvitti
Published: September 12, 2017
Read "Dan Monaghan: The Man Behind The Swing" Interviews Dan Monaghan: The Man Behind The Swing
by Victor L. Schermer
Published: February 16, 2018
Read "Nduduzo Makhathini: Jazz Is a Shared Memory" Interviews Nduduzo Makhathini: Jazz Is a Shared Memory
by Seton Hawkins
Published: February 1, 2018
Read "Camila Meza: Following what the music has to say" Interviews Camila Meza: Following what the music has to say
by Friedrich Kunzmann
Published: February 25, 2018
Read "Remembering John Abercrombie" Interviews Remembering John Abercrombie
by Craig Jolley
Published: August 23, 2017