3

Analog Players Society: Hurricane Season in Brooklyn

Chris M. Slawecki By

Sign in to view read count
Analog Players Society: Hurricane Season in Brooklyn


Hurricane Season in Brooklyn marks the debut of the Analog Players Society (APS), an extension of the lifelong pursuit of the groove by the percussionist, engineer and producer known as Amon, who first discovered Turkish, West African and Middle Eastern music in college—and then dropped out to tour with a circus multi-instrumentalist.

"I eventually moved to Chicago and studied African percussion intensely for four years and traveled to Guinea, West Africa, to study," he recalls. "I eventually studied with Famadou Konate, Mamady Keita and M'Bemba Bangora." Amon's percussive awakening continued through work with DJ Nickodemus and dub legend Lee "Scratch" Perry, and is heard and felt in the vocals, handclaps, breaks and beats in Brooklyn, which Amon completely wrote (except for some lyrics and the cover tunes), arranged, recorded, mixed and produced.

Amon's inventiveness with instrumentation and rhythm is particularly striking in Brooklyn's first two tracks. The opening "Free" is an incredible composition and performance: While drummer Sean "Tricky" Dixon thumps a hip-hop sounding beat—not only a hip-hop rhythm but a hip-hop soundJonathan Powell's trumpet icily skates like Miles Davis' atop congas and other percussion popping Afro-Cuban jam; the eventual horn chart simultaneously overlays Afro-beat and jazz (think Basie big band) horns! "Hurricane Season in Brooklyn" projects the hip, edgy sound of Thievery Corporation and trims Cecilia Stalin's lead vocal in edges that suggest Ella Fitzgerald (in her daring, joyous sense of sound) as a space-age disco diva, and closes in thunder that echoes and fades. Both these tunes approach contemporary funk like Stomu Yamashta's Go approached 1970's blues-rock, and are genuinely, organically brilliant.

"Just a Day" wades in the water of a reggae meets jazz vibe led by Stalin's voice, again so sassily swinging that it splashes then melts in your ear like Chaka Khan. In between, and a bit surprisingly, APS surveys and then remodels three popular dance tunes from the 1980s: "Let the Music Play" (Shannon), where Amon translates the vocal melody to dancehall piano and keyboards to glockenspiel; "I Can't Wait" (Nu Shooz); and "Dance Hall Days" (Wang Chung), transformed into a stately reggae instrumental with the horns "singing the chorus" behind Will Jones's sax, slippery and funky like a really good Eddie Harris recording from the 1970s.

"I like capturing the feel of live music in the studio, but playing live with these guys is the best," Amon says. "We all can learn a set in the afternoon and play it that night. I know I can throw anything at them and when we get on the bandstand, it'll be amazing."

Track Listing

Free; Hurricane Season in Brooklyn; Let the Music Play; I Can't Wait; Dance Hall Days; Just a Day; The Hippie Don' Know; Money Street Rain; Moments Combine.

Personnel

Amon: percussion, tambourine, steps, claps, glockenspiel, bells, cheeky organ; Sean "Tricky" Dixon: drum kit; B. Satz: bass; Ethan White: piano, electric piano, organ, Hammond organ, synthesizer, synth bass, Juno 60, Wurlitzer, vox synthesizer; Cecilia Stalin: vocals; Dave "Smoota" Smith: trombone; Will Jones: tenor saxophone, baritone saxophone; Jonathan Powell: trumpet, valve trombone; Mark "Tewar" Tewarson: guitar, bass; Scott Kettner: drum kit, bells; Jordan Scannella: bass; John Natchez: tenor saxophone, baritone saxophone; Ezra Brown: tenor saxophone, baritone saxophone; Jkriv: bass.

Album information

Title: Hurricane Season in Brooklyn | Year Released: 2013 | Record Label: Studio Brooklyn

Post a comment about this album

Watch

Tags

Shop Amazon

More

Strollin'
Monaco, Meurkens, Hoyson, Lucas
Aufbruch
J. Peter Schwalm / Markus Reuter
Cool With That
East Axis

Popular

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded albums and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, limited reopenings and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary step that will help musicians and venues now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the sticky footer ad). Thank you!

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.