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Trio da Paz and Guests: New York, NY, August 18, 2011

Ernest Barteldes By

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Trio da Paz with guests Joe Locke, Maucha Adnet, Harry Allen
The Music of Antonio Carlos Jobim and Stan Getz
Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola
New York, NY

August 18, 2011

During its two-week residence at Manhattan's Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola, Trio da Paz (Romero Lubambo on guitar, Duduka Da Fonseca, drums, and Nilson Matta, upright bass) played a mix of tunes by Antonio Carlos Jobim and Stan Getz, some original material and other bossa nova-era classics. Augmented by vibraphonist Joe Locke and tenor saxophonist Harry Allen, the group began the set with a down-tempo take on Jobim's "Corcovado," the single from the historic Getz/Gilberto (Verve, 1965) that made bossa a household genre in the United States, made a star out of Astrud Gilberto and contributed to making the album one of the biggest-selling jazz records in history.

The group started improvising within a few bars of beginning the tune, starting with Locke, Allen, Lubambo and, finally, Matta. The group had great chemistry together (Locke participated on Trio da Paz's 2008 disc Live at Jazzbaltica on the Maxjazz label), so the music was completely effortless. They followed with "Sweeping the Chimney," a demanding Lubambo original that showcased each player's individual chops.

Vocalist Maucha Adnet joined in next to sing lead on "Ela E Carioca," a more obscure Jobim composition, on which the band played an arrangement pretty close to the late maestro's original. She also paid tribute to guitarist Dori Caymmi with his "Milagre," a tune that was reportedly one of Jobim's personal favorites.

Adnet and Da Fonseca left the stage for Locke to play (accompanied by Lubambo and Matta) on his own "The Lost Lenore," a tune inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "The Raven." As they performed, lightning was visible crashing down over Manhattan—which somehow suited the song's melancholy feel.

Among the best moments of the evening was when the trio played with its original formation, going through a baiao-inspired Egberto Gismonti song that allowed the three musicians to showcase their individual techniques. The group—with its guests—then closed with a personal rendition of "The Girl From Ipanema" that bore some resemblance to the Getz/Gilberto version, but that kept Trio da Paz's unique signature.

Hearing these musicians play is always a great pleasure. They have worked together for over a decade now, and their talent, chemistry and enthusiasm for the music is truly inspiring

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