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Stephan Micus: Solitary Pursuits

John Kelman By

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Multi- instrumentalist Stephan Micus has been working outside the musical mainstream for over 30 years. With more than 15 albums for the German ECM label and, in the early days, its sister label JAPO, Micus has created a body of work that is the result of years of extensive traveling around the world to both acquire and learn musical instruments ranging from the Armenian double-reed duduk to the Ethiopian 10-string bagana. Micus finds music in the most curious and unexpected of materials, including clay flower pots and large sculpted stones.

A lifelong student of culture and society, Micus finds new ways of combining a rich diversity of ethnic instruments that would simply not be possible under other circumstances, creating a cross-cultural music that is like no other. Indian dilruba blends with Arabian nay; Tibetan chimes mix with Bavarian zithers; and Ghanese dondon unites with Japanese shakuhachi to explore, quite possibly the most affirmed idea of World Music. And while most musicians thrive on the interaction of playing with others, Micus' heavily layered pieces are the result of years of painstaking and solitary pursuit. The result is an arc of recordings that, perhaps more so than most, truly reflects a life's calling that embodies more than merely music, realizing the spiritual search that clearly informs his work as well.

Micus' latest album, Life (ECM, 2004), is in some ways the most ambitious album of his career, based on a Japanese Koan or riddle regarding the meaning of life. From the complex and sprawling "Narration One and the Master's Question," which incorporates the Ethiopian 10-string bagana, Tibetan chimes, Burmese kyeezee (chimes) and maung (gongs), Japanese sho (mouth organ), voices, tin whistle and Bavarian zither, to the stark single voice of "The Master's Answer," Life takes the listener on a journey of discovery and revelation where the answers are often as enigmatic as the questions.

Chapter Index
Beginnings
Meeting Manfred Eicher and Early Recording Process
Instruments
Actors and The Music of Stones
Composing and Recording—A Unique Process
Performing
Visualization and the Next Project

Beginnings

Micus didn't have any particular musical exposure as a youth. "My father was a painter," says Micus. "Growing up I didn't really have any intense contact with music, instead I was exposed more to visual things. Many people say that the covers of my albums are quite special, and I think that's because I choose all the photos myself, so that's perhaps a reflection on my father's visual education.

"And then the music," continues Micus, "I really got into that all by myself. It really started on my 12th birthday when I received a guitar, which I wanted very much, so I started to learn guitar. Later on, listening to Jethro Tull I got interested in the concert flute. I was playing in rock groups by that time and at school. Fairly quickly I got away from that and started making music with English texts and acoustic guitar and, in fact, made my first album while I was still in school. When I was about to finish school in '1970-'1971, I heard my first albums of Indian classical music and that was, for me, an incredible moment, and it really gave a very strong influence to my career and my whole life. So when I finished school I travelled to India overland, it was '1972, to learn Indian music, the sitar, and from then on there was a pattern which continues to this day, which is that I listen to records or concerts, hear some instruments which really attract me, and I go the countries of origin and study them—many instruments including the Japanese shakuhachi and the Armenian duduk."

Meeting Manfred Eicher and Early Recording Process

Following his trip to India in '1972, Micus spent about six months in New York City, and established some connections there that would ultimately lead to his meeting up with ECM label owner and primary producer, Manfred Eicher. "When I was living in Manhattan," Micus explains, "there was a very important public radio station, WBAI. Groups like Oregon used to hang out there; it was like a meeting place for musicians who recorded for ECM in the very early days. At that point I had made my very first recordings in Spain and the director, Judy Sherman (now producer of the Kronos Quartet), liked the tapes and made an hour-long program out of my music. She told me that when I got back to Munich, where I was living in the countryside nearby, I'd have to meet a person called Manfred Eicher, because she thought he'd like my music. From Manhattan I travelled to Japan, and it took me two more years to reach Munich again, but when I finally got home I called him and we met. We started to work together and have now for over 30 years."

Unlike most ECM artists where Eicher is most often intimately involved in everything from pre-production through post-production, Micus is left completely to his own devices, recording everything at his own MCM Studio since To the Evening Child (ECM, '1992). "This is absolutely fantastic," says Micus. "You can get a really great quality studio for $15,000. To get the equipment to produce the same quality of sound when I started cost you a million dollars, so this is really an amazing development and really fantastic for people like me. Manfred was with me in the studio for the first two records, Implosions (JAPO, 1977) and Till the End of Time (JAPO, 1978, reissued ECM, '1993) but since then he hasn't been involved with my recordings at all."

But in the early days, Micus was given the same restriction as most other ECM artists—three days to record and mix. "It was really very difficult," Micus explains. "What I did with the later albums, before I had my own studio, was to put a month between each day. The first ones I did in three consecutive days. I can't really tell you how I did it. It would have been absolutely impossible to do an album like Life. Now that I have my own studio I can invest not only as much time as I want in composing and making demo tapes, but also the actual final recording."

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