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Jazz Migration 2018

Jazz Migration 2018
Henning Bolte By

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Le Dynamo-Banlieu Bleue
Jazz Migration
Paris
December 3, 2018

Selection/support of talent

Jazz Migration started in 2002 to foster, accompany and support the professional career of selected young talent in jazz. Coaching is an important aspect of it and at the core stands the organization and procurement of concerts, nationally and internationally, for an annual selection of four groups of musicians. The four laureates are nominated through an election process opened to 100 promoters inside and outside AJC's network (clubs, festivals, nationals theatres, cultural centers). In addition, a French venue or festival adopts a laureate. The artists follow a training period with a 3-day residency in their sponsor's venue, theoretical training and meetings with professionals. In 2018, the four laureates were on tour in France and Europe for more than 80 gigs!

I already had the pleasure of experiencing two groups of last year's selection, namely Ikui Doki and Novembre, both at Jazzdor Berlin, and Novembre again at Jazztopad Festival in Wroclaw. Here is what I had to say about Ikui Doki appearance in Berlin:

"My personal favorites of this year were a wondrous sound unit of bassoon, harp and saxophone, a surprising and intense pointillist trumpet-piano-drums trinity and an octet with a special twisted charm, vitality and joy of playing the music.

The bassoon-saxophone-harp unit of Sophie Bernado, Hugues Mayot, Raffaelle Rinaudo, called Ikui Doki, was a marvelous affair, captivating not only because of its attractive sound, or the entanglement of their respective instruments and their splendid musical humor, but above all because of the way the three musicians went for, and into, their unfolding stories (for characteristics of some pieces see the slide show at the top of this article). I knew Sophie Bernado already from her strong contribution in several concerts with Eve Risser's great White Desert Orchestra (WDO) and harpist Rafaëlle Rinaudo from her daring duo with WDO bassist Fanny Lasfargues. It was a joy to see them joining forces with versatile reedist Hugues Mayot of the same generation and make something so strong out of it. Bernado is a sassy, imaginative improvising musician and Rinaudo knows the ropes, the rough and the tender, the stormy and the serene side. She used the vibrations of the strings and percussion on her instrument (and body) in a marvelous way. Saxophonist Hugues Mayot operated with great sensibility here in terms of tone and presence." (All About Jazz).

Novembre was playing Berlin too:

"Jazzdor's last night in Berlin started with Novembre, a new young French quartet consisting of saxophonist Antonin-Tri Hoang, pianist Romain Clerc- Renaud, bassist Thibault Cellier and drummer Elie Duris. The group was selected for this year's Jazz Migration program already mentioned above. Antonin Tri Hoang is a key musician of the younger French generation and already a familiar face for Jazzdor. He previously performed with Eve Risser's White Desert Orchestra and as part of German alto player Charlotte Greve's Liesbeth Quartet. Novembre had the same kind of free discursiveness as the Pablo Held trio and some of the polyvalent side of the music of Lüdemann's TEE ensemble, but the quartet gave it shape with higher pressure and sharp turns in a much more grinding manner. The group has developed its very own approach and voice of dynamic transitional diversity, of scraping and reformulation, which holds promising potential." (All About Jazz).

Then I saw Novembre again at Jazztopad Festival 2018 in Wroclaw playing in the Mleczarna Club. The music of these first rate musicians of the French young garde turned out to be a stunning squirreling affair of scorching dynamics and bold about-turns. In stop-and-go mode thereby hitting plenty hooks, accelerating, slowing down, it proceeded crossing and sliding into each other a diversity of rhythms, moods, melodic leads, textures and tempos. Every shred came brilliantly articulated and as a clearly felt part of a greater whole that was breathing the spirit and feel of Ornette Coleman—a kind of fluid mosaic antithesis to Peter Evans' Pulverize The Sound.

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