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Jazz Articles about Mark Wingfield

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Liner Notes

Dwiki Dharmawan: Pasar Klewer

Read "Dwiki Dharmawan: Pasar Klewer" reviewed by John Kelman


Indonesian keyboard star Dwiki Dharmawan returns following his 2015 MoonJune Records debut, the more fusion-heavy So Far, So Close, with the even more ambitious Pasar Klewer. This vibrant, acoustic piano-driven two-CD set features the cream of Britain's younger expat crop, blending with Indonesian musicians to create a passionate, seamless cultural cross-pollination. Bassist Yaron Stavi and drummer/percussionist Asaf Sirkis form the core trio with Dharmawan, while reed multi-instrumentalist Gilad Atzmon, Gamelan musical virtuoso Aris Daryono and guitarists Nicolas Meier ...

34
Album Review

Mark Wingfield & Gary Husband: Tor & Vale

Read "Tor & Vale" reviewed by Glenn Astarita


Before receiving widespread exposure as the keyboardist with John McLaughlin's The 4th Dimension band, Gary Husband's notoriety was firmly centered on his polyrhythmic progressive rock and jazz drumming, rising through the ranks by accompanying prodigious guitarists Allan Holdsworth and Robin Trower, amid stints with Level 42, UK and other notables. Moreover, idiosyncratic guitarist Mark Wingfield's notoriety has skyrocketed since joining Moonjune Records several years ago. On this outing, Husband (piano) and the guitarist delve into improvisational and experimental constructions, where ...

4
Album Review

Mark Wingfield & Gary Husband: Tor & Vale

Read "Tor & Vale" reviewed by Mark Sullivan


Virtuoso guitarist Mark Wingfield was last heard leading a trio on Tales From The Dreaming City (MoonJune Records, 2018). He and pianist Gary Husband may have never played duets together before, but the results sound like it was inevitable--a fated meeting. Opener “Kittiwake" is the first of Wingfield's compositions, a lyrical legato guitar line over a vaguely martial rhythm on the piano. Wingfield lays out for Husband's lovely piano solo, which leads seamlessly into a guitar solo. The piece ends ...

5
Album Review

Mark Wingfield: Tales From The Dreaming City

Read "Tales From The Dreaming City" reviewed by Mark Sullivan


British guitar virtuoso Mark Wingfield is one of the linchpins of the ever-expanding Moonjune Records roster, and his relationship with bassist Yaron Stavi and drummer Asaf Sirkis (both Israeli-born, now based in the U.K.) has been especially fruitful. All three played on the acclaimed improvised album The Stone House (Moonjune Records, 2017) along with touch guitarist Markus Reuter, as well as on Wingfield's previous album Proof Of Light (Moonjune Records, 2015). This is a powerful set of Wingfield originals (plus ...

107
Album Review

Wingfield - Reuter - Sirkis: Lighthouse

Read "Lighthouse" reviewed by Glenn Astarita


Once again, the sky is the limit for these estimable artists who execute spontaneous compositions in the studio without any overdubs or heavy editing. It's largely about the musicians' synchronous game-plan and intuitive interactions during these resonating and impactful works, crossing genres or stylizations that lie somewhere between freeform progressive rock and jazz rock. Lighthouse follows up The Stone House (Moonjune, 2016), even though it was recorded first, and features the core trio of burgeoning guitar hero Mark Wingfield, Touch ...

5
Album Review

Wingfield Reuter Sirkis: Lighthouse

Read "Lighthouse" reviewed by Mark Sullivan


The trio of Mark Wingfield (guitar), Markus Reuter (touch guitar) and Asaf Sirkis (drums) gathered at La Casa Murada Studios in Spain in February, 2016 to improvise the music on this album. There was so much creativity in the air that bassist Yaron Stavi asked to join them for another session--The Stone House (Moonjune Records, 2017)--which was recorded second, but released first. This might make Lighthouse seem anticlimactic, but it definitely is not. The music these musicians made ...

20
Extended Analysis

Wingfield Reuter Stavi Sirkis: The Stone House

Read "Wingfield Reuter Stavi Sirkis: The Stone House" reviewed by John Kelman


At a 2009 ECM @ 40 celebration in Mannheim, Germany that was part of the ongoing Enjoy Jazz Festival, Italian trumpeter Enrico Rava spoke, in a public interview, about how free jazz, back in the day, wasn't really free. There were rules: no time and/or no changes, for example; with memorable melodies not impossible, but not encouraged. Rava continued on to enthuse that now, in the 21st Century, free jazz really is free: if you want to play time, you ...


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