Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page. Read our daily album reviews.

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Album Review

Julius Hemphill: The Boyé Multi-National Crusade For Harmony

Read "The Boyé Multi-National Crusade For Harmony" reviewed by Mark Corroto


There is something inherently objectionable when a billionaire acquires an artistic masterpiece by say, Leonardo DaVinci or Claude Monet, only to sequester it from public view. You might feel the same about Julius Hemphill's recordings Dogon A.D. (Mbari, 1972) and 'Coon Bid'ness (Arista/Freedom, 1975). Both five star recordings, now out of print, cost a small fortune to acquire. Years ago saxophonist Tim Berne, a disciple of Hemphill, endeavored to rescue the saxophonist's Blue Boyé (Mbari, 1977) by rereleasing it in ...

1

Album Review

Rova Orkestrova: No Favorites!

Read "No Favorites!" reviewed by Troy Collins


Ever since its formation in 1977, Rova, the pioneering West Coast saxophone quartet, has been augmenting its ranks to explore structured improvisation. No Favorites! pays homage to Lawrence D. “Butch" Morris, the inventor of Conduction, a revolutionary system for organizing large-ensemble improvisation using coded gestures. This ambitious album epitomizes a working relationship that Rova began with Morris in 1988, while also reflecting parallel working methods reaching back to the mid-1970s. Building on previous efforts in this milieu, the saxophone quartet ...

7

Extended Analysis

Marty Ehrlich: A Trumpet In The Morning

Read "Marty Ehrlich: A Trumpet In The Morning" reviewed by Dan Bilawsky


A Trumpet In The Morning is a first for multi-reedist Marty Ehrlich; it's the first album completely dedicated to his large group works and the first album under his name that's basically directed by his hand rather than his horn(s). The intrepid Ehrlich, who fell under the sway of St. Louis' Black Artists Group (BAG) in his formative years and fell in with the AACM crowd when he arrived in New York in the late '70s, has been putting out ...

6

Album Review

Kyle Bruckmann: On Procedural Grounds

Read "On Procedural Grounds" reviewed by Troy Collins


One of the most common methodologies embraced by the current generation of creative improvising musicians is polystylism--a seamlessly ingrained aesthetic sensibility that transcends the stylized post-modern dilettantism of earlier generations. Bay Area-based oboist Kyle Bruckmann has demonstrated the depth and breadth of this all-inclusive approach in myriad ways, from his art-damaged punk band Lozenge and genre-defying chamber group Wrack to electro-acoustic solo recitals. Accompanied by a handful of colleagues from San Francisco, as well as former associates from his Chicago ...

214

Album Review

Scott Fields Ensemble: Samuel

Read "Samuel" reviewed by Troy Collins


The works of Samuel Beckett have been a recurrent source of inspiration for guitarist Scott Fields. Samuel is Fields' second effort at conveying the master's prose through pure sound, following Beckett (Clean Feed, 2007). Transposing the original text of Beckett's plays into precise pitches, chords and time signatures, Fields transforms Beckett's wordplay into melodies and harmonies that share more than a passing resemblance to jazz. Despite their cerebral origins and abstruse character, the ensuing works are in fact fairly accessible.

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Album Review

Tony Malaby: Paloma Recio

Read "Paloma Recio" reviewed by Mark Corroto


To use a rock 'n' roll analogy, saxophonist Tony Malaby is the Mick Jagger to Joe Lovano's Paul McCartney. It's not that anyone has to choose sides, but if the classic Paul Motian band (featuring Lovano) was The Beatles, then Malaby's Paloma Recio quartet is the Rolling Stones.

Without having to choose sides, Paloma Recio--or “Loud Dove"--has recorded an instant masterpiece of modern music on this self-titled disc.

Malaby, a regular in New York's jazz circles, ...

593

Album Review

Tony Malaby: Paloma Recio

Read "Paloma Recio" reviewed by Troy Collins


One of New York City's most in-demand tenor saxophonists, Tony Malaby has become one of the most distinctive artists of his time. A first generation Mexican-American born in Tucson, Arizona, Paloma Recio finds Malaby delving deeper into his own personal history, abstracting Spanish-tinged melodies with the support of some of the best improvisers working today.

Focusing on Malaby's penchant for unbound lyricism, Paloma Recio (Loud Dove) is the self-titled debut of Malaby's quartet of the same name. Inspired ...


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