Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page. Read our daily album reviews.

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Album Review

Purdie Fabian Oswanski: Move On!

Read "Move On!" reviewed by Chris M. Slawecki


In a 1977 magazine interview, New York Yankees Hall of Famer Reggie Jackson (in)famously referred to himself as “the straw that stirs the drink" for his team. On this trio set with organ player and composer Ron Oswanski and bassist-composer Christian Fabian (who also shaped the arrangements), the one and only original funky drummer Bernard Purdie keeps stirring his drum pots to help this trio's funky and rhythmic grooves to Move On!. The leadoff “The Red Plaza" and ...

4

Album Review

Purdie / Fabian / Oswanski: Move On!

Read "Move On!" reviewed by Jack Bowers


No one receives top billing in this tight-knit trio, which embodies organist Ron Oswanski, bassist Christian Fabian and drummer Bernard “Pretty" Purdie. And that is as it should be, as each of them is indispensable to its success. That success is further predicated on how well the three amigos enhance an agenda that is heavily laden with funk and soul including five greasy compositions by Fabian and others by Duke Ellington, Miles Davis and even Julia Ward Howe (a gritty ...

1

Album Review

Bryant / Fabian / Marsalis: Do For You?

Read "Do For You?" reviewed by Roger Farbey


Lance Bryant and Christian Fabian (both alumni of Berklee College) met when playing in the Lionel Hampton Big Band. Jason Marsalis, a younger member of the famous jazz dynasty, subsequently joined the Hampton band to replace its late leader on vibes. There are several strands to this intriguing recording. The blues is overtly featured in the opener “Five Minute Blues" characterised by Bryant's big toned tenor and his bluesy style pervades many of the numbers sharing a similar sensibility to ...

193

Album Review

Falkner Evans: The Point of the Moon

Read "The Point of the Moon" reviewed by Jeff Dayton-Johnson


Pianist Falkner Evans is a distant relative of the great American novelist William Faulkner, by the same obscure Southern logic by which Al Gore and Gore Vidal are related. He is also a former pianist for the tight Western swing outfit Asleep at the Wheel and leader of an acclaimed piano trio.Evans's famed ancestor once wrote, “The past is never dead. It's not even past." Seen in the right light, this is not a bad axiom for 21st ...

231

Album Review

Falkner Evans: The Point Of The Moon

Read "The Point Of The Moon" reviewed by Mark Corroto


It is natural to equate a bit of hubris with jazz, but pianist Falkner Evans checks his ego at the door on The Point Of The Moon.Like his previous trio session, Arc (CAP, 2007), he returns with bassist Belden Bullock and drummer Matt Wilson, but supplements things with the horn frontline of tenor saxophonist Greg Tardy and trumpeter Ron Horton. If it weren't for Evans' name on The Point Of The Moon's cover, it might not seem like ...

207

Album Review

The Jay D'Amico Trio: Tuscan Prelude: Jazz Under Glass

Read "Tuscan Prelude: Jazz Under Glass" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza


Italy was the source of inspiration that gave semblance to composer, arranger and pianist Jay D'Amico's 2001 recording of Ponte Novello (CAP). He went back to Italy and, as with the earlier visit, found that he was stimulated enough to write more music.

D'Amico became interested in playing the piano after listening to the music of Frederick Chopin and drawn to jazz after seeing an Oscar Peterson performance on television. While his compositions are redolent of his classical bent D'Amico ...

415

Album Review

The Jay D'Amico Trio: Tuscan Prelude: Jazz Under Glass

Read "Tuscan Prelude: Jazz Under Glass" reviewed by Jack Bowers


Some years ago I reviewed Ponte Novello (CAP, 2001) by pianist Jay D'Amico's trio (augmented on four tracks by a string section), and was impressed by the way in which he transposed operatic arias by Puccini, Bellini and Verdi, among others, to the jazz idiom, leaving their inherent beauty intact while proving that those masters have much to say to a contemporary audience if their music is prudently amended under the proper circumstances.

Tuscan Prelude is a collection of original ...


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