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MUSICIAN Born:

Tiny Grimes

Tiny Grimes began his musical career playing drums and piano. In 1938 he took up the guitar choosing the unusual electric 4-string tenor guitar. In 1940 he joined the Cats And A Fiddle as guitarist and singer. In 1943 he joined the Art Tatum Trio as guitarist and made a number of recordings with Tatum. The early Tatum Trio recordings made for the Asch and Comet recording labels are some of the more interesting early examples of Tiny Grimes’ guitar work. After leaving Tatum, Grimes recorded with his own groups in New York and he recorded with a long list of leading musicians; Ike Quebec, Cozy Cole, Leonard Feather and Buck Clayton, among others

ARTICLE: RADIO

Another (Mostly) Sax Attack

Read "Another (Mostly) Sax Attack" reviewed by Marc Cohn

The doctor had a sax attack this week having 'overdosed' on the just-arrived, absolutely gorgeous (and mostly previously unreleased) Paul Desmond box from Mosaic (and I'm more of a 'Phil Woods kind of guy'!). One thing led to another: our chronological Sonny Rollins celebration (The Sound of Sonny); Kenny Garrett with Miles 'live'; Miguel Zenon; Don ...

ARTICLE: RADIO

The Birth of Bebop (1939 - 1945)

Read "The Birth of Bebop (1939 - 1945)" reviewed by Russell Perry

"By the early 1940s... a new approach to small-combo jazz playing was developing, characterized by a more flexible approach to rhythm, a more aggressive pursuit of instrumental virtuosity, and an increasingly adventurous harmonic language."--Scott Deveaux Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk and Coleman Hawkins -the pioneers of Bebop. Playlist Host Intro 0:00 ...

ARTICLE: THE VINYL POST

Charlie Parker: The Complete Savoy and Dial Studio Recordings 1944-1948

Read "Charlie Parker: The Complete Savoy and Dial Studio Recordings 1944-1948" reviewed by C. Andrew Hovan

So it is no secret that the entertainment industry is floundering these days and that record companies are doing just about anything to snatch some bucks away from the pirates and casual listeners. Perhaps this is why vinyl has become such a hot commodity. Blue Note spent the past two years reissuing classic titles on black ...

ARTICLE: PROFILE

James Clay: Texas Tenor, Second Generation

Read "James Clay: Texas Tenor, Second Generation" reviewed by David Perrine

The term “Texas tenor" was originally coined to describe the sound and style of such swing era players as Herschel Evans, Illinois Jacquet, Buddy Tate, Budd Johnson, Arnett Cobb and others, and has subsequently been applied to second generation players from Texas that included James Clay, David “Fathead" Newman and Marchel Ivery. What these players had ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Art Tatum: Trio Days

Read "Trio Days" reviewed by Marc Davis

I was wrong. I like Art Tatum. But in a slightly different way. My introduction to Art Tatum, many years ago, was a series of solo piano albums. They left me cold. No question, the man was gifted beyond belief. He could play faster, more accurately and with a greater sense of ...

ARTICLE: EXTENDED ANALYSIS

Charlie Parker: The Complete Masters 1941-54

Read "Charlie Parker: The Complete Masters 1941-54" reviewed by Chris May

Charlie ParkerThe Complete Masters 1941-54Universal France2012 It is possible that more “complete" collections of the work of Charlie Parker have been released than there were recordings made by the saxophonist. And as you beat your way through the box set undergrowth, caution is required. Few of the ...

ARTICLE: INTERVIEW

Odean Pope: A Singular Voice in the Choir

Read "Odean Pope: A Singular Voice in the Choir" reviewed by Elliott Simon

Grounded in the Baptist spirituals of his youth followed by a musical upbringing in Philadelphia with the likes of John Coltrane and organist Jimmy Smith as mentors, tenor saxophonist Odean Pope is the bridge between hard bop and free. His contributions to jazz are of major historical significance and through his over ...

ARTICLE: WHAT IS JAZZ?

The Story of Jazz Guitar

Read "The Story of Jazz Guitar" reviewed by AAJ Staff

While in its early days, jazz guitar was considered a rhythm instrument alongside the banjo of Dixieland. In 1940, Charlie Christian and his Gibson ES-150 changed that and elevated guitar to lead instrument status alongside the saxophone and trumpet--instruments that could acoustically cut through the sound of a piano-bass-drums rhythm section. Here, we encapsulate some of ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Ray Nance: Body and Soul

Read "Body and Soul" reviewed by Jeff Dayton-Johnson

Ray Nance recorded Body and Soul, his first album as a leader, in May 1969, almost thirty years after he took over Cootie Williams' trumpet chair in the Duke Ellington orchestra, but only about two years after Billy Strayhorn's death in May 1967, and mere days after Coleman Hawkins' in May 1969. Nance performed “Take the ...


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