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Musician

Stan Tracey

Born:

Stan Tracey is an outstanding figure in the jazz world. His distinguished career has spanned five decades of flourishing creativity. He has been a highly influential and stimulating musical voice, not only to his peers but to each successive generation of musicians with whom he has worked.

Stan’s capricious piano playing combines the percussive melody of Thelonious Monk with the robust lyricism of Ellington in a highly idiosyncratic style. A master of harmony, he possesses a potent and compelling improviser’s intellect. Through Stan Tracey’s unflinching commitment and dedication has emerged a very rare artist who has sustained an output of highly exceptional music throughout his career.

A self-taught musician, Stan played his first professional engagement aged sixteen. The unlikely start of such a prestigious career saw him working for the forces entertainment network ENSA. However he quickly became involved in the lively emerging London jazz scene of the 1950s, playing in the bands of Laurie Morgan, Kenny Baker, Ronnie Scott and Tony Crombie.

From 1957-9 he played piano and vibraphone and arranged for the Ted Heath Orchestra. As house pianist at Ronnie Scott’s club from 1961 to 1967 Stan played with many of the most important figures in jazz history including Ben Webster, Roland Kirk, Wes Montgomery, Stan Getz, Zoot Sims and Sonny Rollins. His stature at that time is illustrated by his collaboration with Sonny Rollins which produced some of the most creative music of both musicians’ careers.

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News: TV / Film

Documentary: Stan Tracey

Documentary: Stan Tracey

Little-known in America but a jazz force in the U.K., Stan Tracey was a British pianist who was highly influenced by Duke Ellington and Thelonious Monk. Tracey's keyboard attack was stormy, percussive and deeply felt, but he also could play straight-ahead jazz and worked and recorded with Ted Heath for years. He also was the house ...

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Article: Radio & Podcasts

England vs. Italy: A Jazz Re-match, First Half

Read "England vs. Italy: A Jazz Re-match, First Half" reviewed by Ludovico Granvassu


A few days ago, England and Italy faced each other in the finals of the European Soccer Cup. It was a compelling match with a nail-biting end between two teams that exceeded expectations and that promise to have a brilliant future. Italy won in a penalty shootout because in sports--especially in the finals of a tournament--there ...

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Article: Album Review

Don Rendell / Ian Carr Quintet: Blue Beginnings

Read "Blue Beginnings" reviewed by Chris May


Summer 2021 is proving to be the summer British jazz delved into its mid 1960s through mid 1970s album back catalogue and previously unreleased tape archive, with both major and specialist labels such as Jazz In Britain joining in the party. The spur to action is, of course, the new and unprecedented popularity of British jazz ...

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Article: Album Review

Various: Journeys In Modern Jazz: Britain (1965-1972)

Read "Journeys In Modern Jazz: Britain (1965-1972)" reviewed by Chris May


As British jazz in 2021 reaches domestic and international audiences of unprecedented size, so record companies are being emboldened to open up their archives and reissue long-buried treasures. So, too, are new labels being formed to make available recordings which have not previously been released, but which have survived in the tape libraries of the musicians ...

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Article: Festivals Talking

Corrado Beldì il poliedrico: su NovaraJazz e non solo

Read "Corrado Beldì il poliedrico: su NovaraJazz e non solo" reviewed by Libero Farnè


Dopo aver partecipato a NovaraJazz per un paio di giorni nel 2008 e nel 2011, ho incontrato di nuovo il suo direttore artistico Corrado Beldì al Talos Festival di Ruvo di Puglia nel 2014, quando di scena era l'Instant Composers Pool. Mi trovai di fronte un quarantenne giovanile, estroverso, sempre pronto a una risata contagiosa e ...

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Article: Building a Jazz Library

Guitar Gods & Goddesses: An Alternative Top Ten Albums

Read "Guitar Gods & Goddesses: An Alternative Top Ten Albums" reviewed by Chris May


Although it has been present in jazz since the 1920s, when it was routinely used in rhythm sections, as a solo instrument the guitar struggled to make itself heard--literally--until the second half of the 1930s, when reliable pick-ups and portable amplifiers became available. Foremost among the pioneers of the electrified instrument was Charlie Christian, a member ...

Album

Soho Scene '66 and '67: Jazz Goes Mod

Label: Rhythm & Blues Records
Released: 2020
Track listing: 1. Humphrey Lyttelton: The Men From Auntie; 2. Ian Hamer: What's Her Name?; 3. Mike Carr Trio: Cox's Pippin; 4. Tubby Hayes Quartet: Change of Setting; 5. Gordon Beck: Virgo; 6. The Don Rendell / Ian Carr Quintet: Tootin' And Flutin'; 7. Ronnie Scott: Treat It Lightly; 8. Stan Tracey Quartet: Pig and Pepper; 9. Michael Garrick: Shiva; 10. Les Condon: Freedom Monday; 11. John Surman Quartet: Blues Da Camera; 12. Alex Welsh: Bluesology; 13. Johnny Scott And His Orchestra: Punjab; 14. Danny Moss: Dear Old Stockholm; 15. Ronnie Ross: Ugetsu; 16. Kenny Clare, Ronnie Stephenson: Afro-Charlie; 17. Neil Ardley: Big P; 18. Sonny Rollins: Themes From Alfie; 19. Freddie McCoy: Lonely Avenue; 20. Jimmy Coe: Cold Jam for Breakfast; 21. Charlie Earland Trio: The Dozens; 22. Pucho: What A Piece; 23. Jimmy Tillman: Vampire; 24. Les McCann Ltd.: Bat Man; 25. Gabor Szabo: Mizrab; 26. Milt Jackson: A Time And A Place; 27. Merl Saunders: Soul Roach; 28. Prince Lasha Ensemble: Nuttin' Out Jones; 29. Hugh Masekela: Unhlanhla; 30. Richard "Groove" Holmes: Boo-D-Doo; 31. The Three Sounds: Mohair Sam; 32. Birds Of Paradise: Bossa Blue Port; 33. Freddie Roach: One Track Mind; 34. Jimmy McGriff: Hallelujah; 35. Sarah Cantine: Feeling Good; 36. Eric Kloss: Just For Fun-K; 37. Ken Jensen Quartet: Captain Jack; 38. Gene Ludwig: Soul Mountain; 39. Milt Sealey Trio: Black Diamond; 40. Kenny Rankin: In The Name Of Love; 41. The Harry South Big Band: Limited Freedom; 42. Carmen McRae: Got To Get You Into My Life; 43. The Mike Carr Quartet: Nico's Dream; 44. Tubby Hayes Quartet: Finky Minky; 45. Joe Harriott Quintet: Strollin' South; 46. Tony Coe: Baby Blue; 47. The Stan Tracey Big Band: Murdering The Time; 48. The Johnny Scott Quintet: It's For You; 49. The Dave Lee Quintet: Time Check; 50. Dudley Moore Trio: Rupert's Romp; 51. Dick Morrissey Quartet: Le Roi; 52. Georgie Fame Quartet: Serves Me Right To Suffer; 53. The Mike Carr Quartet: Bells Blues; 54. Ike Isaacs: Sad September; 55. Eric Delaney: Blues March Eric Delaney & Louie Bellson; 56. Humphrey Lyttelton: Blue Monk; 57. Johnny Hawksworth: Listen To Music; 58. Stan Tracey Quartet: Everywhere Derriere; 59. Curtis Amy: Mustang; 60. Young Holt Unlimited: Yon Gimmie Thum; 61. Johnny Lytle Quintet: ‎Gonna Get That Boat; 62. Fred Ramirez: Comin' Home Baby; 63. Jerome Richardson: Sunny; 64. Les McCann: Bucket O' Grease; 65. The Jimmy Owens - Kenny Barron Quintet: You Had Better Listen; 66. Bubbha Thomas & The Lightmen Plus One: Luke; 67. Chico O'Farrill And His Orchestra: Hip Hug Her; 68. Byrdie Green: In The Dark; 69. Cash McCall: You Ain’t Too Cool; 70. Hank Jacobs: East Side; 71. Johnny Hammond: Dirty Apple; 72. Latin Jazz Quintet: Daria; 73. Freddie McCoy: Peas 'n' Rice; 74. Lionel Hampton: Greasy Greens; 75. Harold Johnson Sextet: Sorry Bout That; 76. Ray Pettis: 2 Step; 77. Odell Brown & The Organ-Izers: Quiet Village; 78. The Soul Society: The Sidewinder.

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Article: Album Review

Alan Wakeman: The Octet Broadcasts 1969 and 1979

Read "The Octet Broadcasts 1969 and 1979" reviewed by Chris May


Despite a perception fostered by the more breathless media coverage given to the young lions who have emerged on the London scene since the mid 2010s, an identifiably British strand of jazz did not kick off when Shabaka Hutchings' Sons Of Kemet released its debut album in 2013. The groundwork was laid back in the 1950s ...

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Article: Profile

Keith Tippett: 100 Best Foots Forward

Read "Keith Tippett: 100 Best Foots Forward" reviewed by Duncan Heining


From the Albert Hall at twenty-two with a fifty-piece band to picking potatoes to make ends meet a decade later, Keith Tippett's life in music could sum up many a jazz career. After a grim '80s, things now look better for the composer, pianist and bandleader. “What I'm about to say is ridiculous but it was ...


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