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Pete Brown

Born:

Pete Brown was born in Surrey on Christmas Day, 1940 to a Jewish family who had fled London to escape the Blitz. With a keen interest in the war, what was happening and its aftermath, Pete moved back to London in 1951. Here he attended a Jewish Grammar School but was expelled when enforced religion took its toll. Pete began writing poetry in 1955, initially inspired by Dylan Thomas, Gerard Manley Hopkins and later the US Beats. For many years he moved between menial jobs until he got his first break and his work began to get published, primarily in America. Pete met poet, Mike Horovitz at the Beaulieu Jazz Festival in 1960 and joined his travelling arts group, New Departures

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Article: Profile

Pete Brown: White Rooms & Imaginary Westerns, Part 2

Read "Pete Brown: White Rooms & Imaginary Westerns, Part 2" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Part 1 | Part 2 1966 was an important year in British popular music. Bob Dylan, performing with the Hawks, was booed for “going electric" at Manchester Free Trade Hall. The Rolling Stones topped the charts for the first time with “Paint It Black." The Beatles, fresh from the John Lennon “Bigger than Jesus" ...

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Article: Profile

Pete Brown: White Rooms & Imaginary Westerns, Part 1

Read "Pete Brown: White Rooms & Imaginary Westerns, Part 1" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Part 1 | Part 2 Poet, lyricist, rock musician, producer and scriptwriter—Pete Brown has covered a lot of bases in his six decades in music and literature. His career embodies that era that began with the Beatles' “Love Me Do" in October 1962 and ended in January 1969 with the band playing live on ...

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Article: Jazz Poetry

Poetry and Jazz: A Chronology

Read "Poetry and Jazz: A Chronology" reviewed by Duncan Heining


My intention here is to offer a detailed but inevitably incomplete chronology of poetry and jazz. The focus is solely on the combination of the two art forms in performance, not on poetry about jazz or jazz musicians or poetry inspired by jazz but not performed to music. My definition of 'poetry' is fairly broad and ...

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Article: The Big Question

Presenting Problem

Read "Presenting Problem" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Jazz often appears to exist within its own cultural and artistic paradigm, isolated from other arts and in its own discreet musical corner. Worse still from the perspective of those who would hope to make a living from it, it often seems that more people want to play the music than listen to it or, more ...

Article: Extended Analysis

Columbia Years 1968-1969

Read "Columbia Years 1968-1969" reviewed by Maurizio Comandini


La piccola ma intraprendente casa discografica statunitense, Light in the Attic, in collaborazione con la major Sony/Columbia, piazza un uppercut formidabile che toglie il velo ad uno dei misteri meglio preservati della discografia del secolo scorso. Vengono infatti pubblicati per la prima volta i cinque brani che Betty Davis, nata Betty Mabry e sposata con Miles ...

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Article: Album Review

Chris Spedding: Songs Without Words

Read "Songs Without Words" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Recorded for Harvest in 1970, Songs Without Words was only originally released in Japan. At the time, Chris Spedding was a much sought after guitarist in jazz and rock with one of the most impressive of CVs--Mike Westbrook, Michael Gibbs, Jack Bruce, Ian Carr's Nucleus, Pete Brown and Frank Ricotti amongst others. The reason for its ...

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Article: Profile

Graham Bond: Wading in Murky Waters

Read "Graham Bond: Wading in Murky Waters" reviewed by Duncan Heining


Organist and saxophonist Graham Bond was the most important and influential musical pioneer to emerge from British jazz in the 1960s. High praise indeed, but in his case it is warranted. His legacy might be defined less by the music he recorded and more by the impact he had on subsequent generations of musicians. However, that ...

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News: Recording

Bud Shank's Last Recording: Jake Fryer's "In Good Company"

Bud Shank's Last Recording: Jake Fryer's "In Good Company"

If there is still a west coast kind of jazz it's because players associated with the west coast still play music. That's obvious, of course, but even in its heyday the west coast style covered a broad group of stylistic tendencies, from the cool of a Chet Baker to the heat of Hampton Hawes. Bud Shank ...


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