All About Jazz

Home » Search Center » Results: Oscar Pettiford

Results for "Oscar Pettiford"

Advanced search options

Musician

Oscar Pettiford

Born:

Oscar Pettiford born in Okmulgee, Oklahoma, was a double bassist, cellist and composer known particularly for his pioneering work in bebop. Pettiford's mother was Choctaw and his father was half Cherokee and half African American. Like many African Americans with Native American ancestry, his Native heritage was not generally known except to a few close friends (which included David Amram). In 1942 he joined the Charlie Barnet band and in 1943 gained wider public attention after recording with Coleman Hawkins on his "The Man I Love." He also recorded with Earl Hines and Ben Webster around this time

15

Article: Album Review

Doug MacDonald: Live in Hawaii

Read "Live in Hawaii" reviewed by Jack Bowers


Here is a guitar-led quartet with a couple of fresh angles. First, instead of using a piano, guitarist Doug MacDonald has enlisted vibraphonist Noel Okimoto to provide the harmonic counterpoint; and second, Philadelphia-born MacDonald has temporarily forsaken his decades-long base in Southern California to return “home" to Hawaii, where he began his professional career performing with ...

7

Article: Take Five With...

Take Five with Will Lyle

Read "Take Five with Will Lyle" reviewed by AAJ Staff


Meet Will Lyle Born in Southern California, Will began studying cello when he was three and also played drums, guitar, piano and percussion, taking up the electric bass at the age of 12. “I had aspirations to become a producer and I originally went to Berklee for musical production, but during my freshman year I heard ...

4

Article: Album Review

Larry Newcomb Quartet: Love, Dad

Read "Love, Dad" reviewed by Jack Bowers


Guitarist Larry Newcomb has dedicated Love, Dad, his third recording as leader, to his three sons, one of whom—Jake Newcomb—is the bassist in his dad's quartet. Even though Larry must be elated to have a son who is walking, as it were, in his musical footsteps, it's clear that Jake isn't on board simply because his ...

21

Article: Building a Jazz Library

Charlie Parker: Ten High Flying Albums Of Paradigm Shifting Genius

Read "Charlie Parker: Ten High Flying Albums Of Paradigm Shifting Genius" reviewed by Chris May


Born in Kansas City, Kansas in 1920, and brought up across the state line in anything-goes, jazz-friendly Kansas City, Missouri, controlled from the mid 1920s to the late 1930s by the spectacularly corrupt politician Tom Prendergast, alto saxophonist Charlie Parker lived fast and hard and passed in 1955, aged only 34 years. A founding father of ...

37

Article: Building a Jazz Library

Blue Note Records: Lost In Space: 20 Overlooked Classic Albums

Read "Blue Note Records: Lost In Space: 20 Overlooked Classic Albums" reviewed by Chris May


For anyone with a passion for Blue Note, it is hard to conceive of an album that has been “overlooked," let alone twenty of them. For connoisseurs of the most influential label in jazz history, the passion can be all consuming: if a dedicated collector does not have all the albums (yet), he or she will ...

3

Article: Album Review

George DeLancey: Paradise

Read "Paradise" reviewed by Mark Corroto


Is it acceptable to label a musical recording as “delicious"? If so, it describes bassist George DeLancey's sophomore release Paradise. He presents eight compositions, half from his pen and the remaining from Oscar Pettiford, John Lewis, Thelonious Monk, and Jerome Kern/Oscar Hammerstein. The eight tracks, none of which tops five minutes, are well balanced with solos ...

61

Article: Building a Jazz Library

Prestige Records: An Alternative Top 20 Albums

Read "Prestige Records: An Alternative Top 20 Albums" reviewed by Chris May


Along with Alfred Lion's Blue Note and Orrin Keepnews' Riverside, Bob Weinstock's Prestige was at the top table of independent New York City-based jazz labels from the early 1950s until the mid 1960s. Like those other two labels, Prestige built up a profuse catalogue packed with enduring treasures. Originally a record retailer, Weinstock ...

47

Article: Building a Jazz Library

Riverside Records: An Alternative Top Ten

Read "Riverside Records: An Alternative Top Ten" reviewed by Chris May


From 1953, when it was set up, to 1964, when it was acquired by ABC, Riverside Records rivalled Blue Note and Prestige as one of the leading independent jazz labels based in New York City. The founders of all three labels were jazz fans who operated on slim margins and became producers partly because they enjoyed ...

11

Article: Reassessing

Dial "S" for Sonny

Read "Dial "S" for Sonny" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


Pianist Sonny Clark was culturally marginalized in much the same way as his contemporary Elmo Hope—both heroin-addicted jazz musicians in the 1950s: at the time, and romantically, a cliche. Both pianists have been sorely lumped into the “Bud Powell school of bop piano" which superficially may seem accurate until one considers the evolutionary continuum of jazz ...


Engage

Contest Giveaways
Enter our latest contest giveaway sponsored by AGS Recordings
Publisher's Desk
Jazz Near You Turns 10
Read on.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.