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Musician

Little Walter

Born:

Little Walter could make his harp sound like a tenor sax; he was instrumental in defining the sound that is now known as Chicago blues harp. Singer, composer, bandleader and peerless harmonica virtuoso, Little Walters music in virtually all its significant details was forged in the crucible of the emerging and maturing postwar Chicago Blues. It was as a member of, and a vital contributor to the Muddy Waters band that Walter was given full rein to stretch his wings, and it is a tribute to Muddy's foresight and generosity of spirit that he early recognized Walter's great talent and allowed him every opportunity and encouragement to develop it.

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Article: Multiple Reviews

The Tim Carman Trio And GA-20: Everything Old Is New Again

Read "The Tim Carman Trio And GA-20: Everything Old Is New Again" reviewed by Doug Collette


An author and educator besides a musician, Boston-based Tim Carman might well qualify as a renaissance man. Based on two closely coincidental releases on which he appears, not to mention an increasingly lengthy discography including prior titles with these very same ensembles, he's certainly an artist to be reckoned with. It is one thing to have ...

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Article: Interview

Leonard E. Jones: Taking Control Of Destiny

Read "Leonard E. Jones: Taking Control Of Destiny" reviewed by Barbara Ina Frenz


Bassist and photographer Leonard E. Jones laid the foundation of his musical and artistic ideas as an original member of the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians. The AACM ranks as the most well-known and influential organization of the 1960s under African American leadership that created American experimental music through challenging “racialized limitations on venues ...

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Article: Book Review

Bob Dylan: The Philosophy of Modern Song

Read "Bob Dylan: The Philosophy of Modern Song" reviewed by Doug Collette


The Philosophy of Modern Song Bob Dylan 352 Pages ISBN: # 978-1451648706 Simon & Schuster 2022 Bob Dylan's The Philosophy of Modern Song is a labor of love by a music lover of unremitting passion. As such, it is hard to put it down once the reading commences, ...

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Article: New York Beat

Voices of Mississippi at Jazz at Lincoln Center

Read "Voices of Mississippi at Jazz at Lincoln Center" reviewed by Nick Catalano


The research into music programming for concerts at Jazz at Lincoln Center has always been top-notch, providing important informational fodder for reviewers. Perhaps none has been as significant and revelatory as the material used for the February 25-26 concerts with a truly seminal group--Voices of Mississippi. The origin and nature of the blues and ...

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Article: Multiple Reviews

Wilburt Lee Reliford and Nic Clark: No Ill Wind Blown Here

Read "Wilburt Lee Reliford and Nic Clark: No Ill Wind Blown Here" reviewed by Doug Collette


For a musical instrument so small, the range in sound(s) from a harmonica is nothing less than remarkable. The airy tones of Toots Thielemans and Howard Levy sound nothing like the earthy warbles that of Little Walter and James Cotton, while sinuous lines from the late Norton Buffalo, long-time member of the Steve Miller Band. hardly ...

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Article: Interview

John McLaughlin: Where The Muse Leads

Read "John McLaughlin: Where The Muse Leads" reviewed by Mike Jacobs


John McLaughlin—Miles Davis protégé. Jazz/rock revolutionary. East-meets-West visionary. Acoustic, electric and electronic guitar maestro. Now elder statesman of jazz—what is there left to say? A lot it seems... As a septuagenarian who was facing debilitating hand issues—and possibly the end of his playing career—he was starting to say his farewells to touring ...

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Article: Building a Jazz Library

John Scofield As A Sideman: The Best Of…

Read "John Scofield As A Sideman: The Best Of…" reviewed by Ian Patterson


John Scofield is a modern-day jazz legend, one of the most instantly recognizable voices on the guitar, and an inspiration to many. In a solo career that began in earnest in 1977, Scofield has carved out his own sound on dozens of albums, including his tribute to Steve Swallow, Swallow Tales (ECM, 2020), a trio album ...

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Article: Profile

Cotton Pickin' Blues

Read "Cotton Pickin' Blues" reviewed by Martin McFie


Blues began with enslaved African peoples' work songs in the cotton fields of the Deep South of America. The Slave Narrative of Mr. Sam Polite, given at 93 years of age, chronicles that life. It was written on St. Helena, a cotton producing Sea Island in the Carolinas, where Mr. Polite was born into slavery. The ...

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Article: Album Review

Various Artists: Confessin' The Blues

Read "Confessin' The Blues" reviewed by Doug Collette


If it weren't so scrupulously annotated (at least up to a point) or attractively designed, this title might be flippantly described as “The Greatest Hits of the Blues." As is, it is the third in a roots revival series of sorts. Confessin' The Blues follows Chicago Plays the Stones (Raisin' Music, 2018), where a Windy city ...


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