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Musician

Don Redman

Born:

Don Redman is considered the first jazz composer/arranger by many. He was also the first musician with both the inspiration and academic knowledge for this style of music. In short, he invented jazz writing for the big band, not only writing separate parts for reed and brass "choirs", leaving room for hot solos, but putting sections in opposition which solved the problems of the new style, thus showing everyone else how to do it. His brother led a band in Cumberland, Maryland and his father was a noted music teacher and had performed in a brass band. His mother was a singer. Don began playing the trumpet at the age of three, joined his first band at 6 and by the age of 12 was proficient on all wind instruments including the oboe

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News: Book / Magazine

First Complete Discography Of Early Interracial Jazz Sessions by Stephen Provizer

First Complete Discography Of Early Interracial Jazz Sessions by Stephen Provizer

As Long As They Can Blow: Interracial Jazz Recording and Other Jive Before 1935 has just been released in print, eBook and .pdf download. Author Stephen Provizer has amassed a discography of hundreds of interracial recording sessions, which include some of the most well-known jazz musicians of the era, including Jelly Roll Morton, Coleman Hawkins, Eddie ...

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Article: Interview

The Ditties: Finding Freedom in Swing

Read "The Ditties: Finding Freedom in Swing" reviewed by Matthew Vasiliauskas


When asked what interested her about the jazz art form, Nina Simone responded, “I had spent many years pursuing excellence, because that is what classical music is all about. But jazz is dedicated to freedom, and that is far more important." Typically, what drives an artist's ambition, is the desire to hold mastery over ...

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Article: Album Review

Umlaut Big band: Mary's Ideas

Read "Mary's Ideas" reviewed by Mark Corroto


In the liner notes of Embraced (Pablo Live, 1978), Mary Lou Williams defends the late music of John Coltrane thus ..."the healing power comes from the deep feeling that is in jazz--the feeling of the Blues which is characteristic of all good jazz no matter what form it takes. Even John Coltrane's music was never without ...

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Article: Building a Jazz Library

Eddie Sauter: A Wider Focus

Read "Eddie Sauter: A Wider Focus" reviewed by Chris May


For many people, composer and arranger Eddie Sauter's reputation begins and ends with Stan Getz's Focus (Verve, 1962). The album is, indeed, a masterpiece. But it is only one of the pinnacles of Sauter's career, which started during the swing era. Nor is Focus Sauter's only collaboration with Getz. The partnership continued with the less widely ...

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Article: Building a Jazz Library

Sex & Drugs & Jazz & Jive: Top Ten Stash Records Albums

Read "Sex & Drugs & Jazz & Jive: Top Ten Stash Records Albums" reviewed by Chris May


With all the transgressive flair you would expect of bohemian New York City in the 1970s and 1980s, Bernie Brightman's Stash Records made its name with a hugely entertaining series of sex and drugs-themed compilations of swing-era recordings. The first was Reefer Songs in 1976. But Brightman's legacy extends much further. There was a finite amount ...

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Article: Radio & Podcasts

Vic Juris & Dizzy Reece

Read "Vic Juris & Dizzy Reece" reviewed by Joe Dimino


We keep our traction here in 2020 as we begin the 629th Episode of Neon Jazz with talented modern day drummer Tyshawn Sorey. We talked about his roots and influneces in jazz and he noted Duke Ellington, John Coltrane and Dizzy Gillespie. From there, we get into new tunes for the new year with Canadian cat ...

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Article: Interview

Rick Lawn: The Evolution of Big Band Sounds in America

Read "Rick Lawn: The Evolution of Big Band Sounds in America" reviewed by Victor L. Schermer


From the latter part of the Jazz Age through the Swing Era, big bands dominated the jazz scene and a large part of the entertainment industry. After World War II, their fortunes declined, but their music soared to new heights, spurred on by innovative leaders, instrumentalists, and very importantly, the composers/arrangers who worked behind the scenes ...

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Article: Radio & Podcasts

Birth of the Big Bands 1923 - 1936)

Read "Birth of the Big Bands 1923 - 1936)" reviewed by Russell Perry


In the last hour, we listened to the pioneering jazz orchestra of Duke Ellington. Large jazz ensembles, such as Ellington's, soon to be known as “Big Bands," evolved through the 1920s with significant innovations led by bandleaders Fletcher Henderson, Benny Carter, Jimmie Lunceford and Don Redman, and arrangers Carter, Redman, Edgar Sampson and Sy Oliver. By ...

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Article: Radio & Podcasts

Up In Harlem - The Bands (1924 - 1929)

Read "Up In Harlem - The Bands (1924 - 1929)" reviewed by Russell Perry


In the last hour, we explored the jazz of King Oliver's Chicago in the 1920s, and heard from The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, clarinetists Jimmy Noone and Johnny Dodds, pianists Earl Hines and Lovie Austin, cornetist Freddie Keppard and trumpeter Jabbo Smith. Now we move to the other emerging center of the music, New ...


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