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ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley: Terra Incognita

Read "Terra Incognita" reviewed by Troy Dostert

In a musical career that stretches back to the 1980s, tenor saxophonist Rich Halley has stoutly maintained his independent path in creating jazz that is inspired by the freedom of the '60s avant-garde but which also draws liberally from the language of bop. You can hear both Albert Ayler and Sonny Rollins in his playing. But ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley with Matthew Shipp, Michael Bisio and Newman Taylor Baker: Terra Incognita

Read "Terra Incognita" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

Rich Halley's leader debut Multnomah Rhythms (Avocet, 1983) featured a large ensemble, a formation that the saxophonist favored for the better part of two decades. When he pared back personnel, he was equally committed to his quartet, recording six albums with trombonist Michael Vlatkovich, bassist Clyde Reed and son, Carson Halley on drums. The Outlier (Pine ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley: Terra Incognita

Read "Terra Incognita" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Saxophonist Rich Halley usually sticks with his steady crowd. Indeed, when tallying Halley's collaborative compadres over the past couple of decades, his list of “recorded with" players comes down to a handful of names: drummer Carson Halley, trombonist Michael Vlatkovich and bassist Clyde Reed. Add cornetist Bobby Bradford on a couple of outings. The same for ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley 3: The Literature

Read "The Literature" reviewed by Jerome Wilson

Before now saxophonist Rich Halley has chosen only to play original music on all his recordings as a leader. Now, on his twenty-first disc, he changes up and goes back to what he calls “the literature," the music and musicians that influenced his career path. Most of what he covers here is by iconic jazz figures ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley 3: The Literature

Read "The Literature" reviewed by Jim Trageser

Tenor saxophonist Rich Halley decided, according to the liner notes, to make his twenty-first recording an all-covers collection. The title of the recording, he writes, comes from his thought that if “literature" connotes a body of work in classical music, then why not in jazz as well--and so he's collected a dozen of the songs that ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley 3: The Literature

Read "The Literature" reviewed by Karl Ackermann

A native of Oregon, saxophonist Rich Halley spent enough time in Chicago to absorb the ethos of the AACM and intermingle the influences of Thelonius Monk, Charles Mingus, and Ornette Coleman, to name a few of his inspirations. Over his thirty-five year recording career he has worked with Michael Bisio, Bobby Bradford, Nels Cline, Vinny Golia, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley/Carson Halley: The Wild

Read "The Wild" reviewed by Dan McClenaghan

Saxophonist Rich Halley, home-based in Portland, Oregon, is a relentless creator of fine and oftimes fiery free jazz, averaging, since 2010, about two CD releases per year, including Creating Structure (2015); Eleven (2016); and Outlier, (2016), all on his Pine Eagle Records label. These were quartet outings, featuring like-minded free-jazzers--trombonist Michael Vlatkovich, bass man Clyde Reed ...

ARTICLE: MULTIPLE REVIEWS

Piano & More: Rich Halley 5, Casey Golden Trio, Jeff Denson Quartet, Fred Hersch Trio, Peter Erskine Trio, & Sirius Quartet

Read "Piano & More: Rich Halley 5, Casey Golden Trio, Jeff Denson Quartet, Fred Hersch Trio, Peter Erskine Trio, & Sirius Quartet" reviewed by Mark Sullivan

An assortment of striking jazz/improvisation recordings. Three of them are piano trios--each with their own unique character--but two of them have no piano, or any other harmonic instrument. Rich Halley 5 The Outlier Pine Eagle Records 2016 Tenor saxophonist Rich Halley's longstanding quartet with trombonist Michael Vlatkovich, ...

ARTICLE: ALBUM REVIEW

Rich Halley 5: The Outlier

Read "The Outlier" reviewed by Budd Kopman

The Outlier feels like the third part of a triptych which started with Creating Structure, followed by Eleven. The former recording demonstrated how structure can be created during improvisation, while the latter how more- or-less composed music with structure can be the foundational basis for improvisation. The record at hand mixes the two concepts ...


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