Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

117

Ted Nash: Sidewalk Meeting

Mark Corroto By

Sign in to view read count
Worlds collide. It’s the 21st century and it is expected for worlds of music to collide, especially in jazz. The music originated at the collusion of cultures down New Orleans way and today’s references to classical, klezmer, Balkan, and African music goes down hardly noticed by the listening public. Ted Nash’s band Odeon, like Dave Douglas’ Charms of the Night Sky outfit, utilize a strong accordion sound to mix musical cultures.

Nash, a member of the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, arranged this unique blend of music and instrumentation. His bass clarinet winds around the plunger trombone of Wycliffe Gordon, Miri Ben-Ari’s violin and William Schimmel’s accordion throughout. They open with Debussy mined from New Orleans by way of an Argentinean tango (read swinging). Nash whets your appetite for the possibilities of this band, then delivers with individual examples like a Crescent City inspired “Jump Line,” the Argentina “Tango Sierra,” and the Middle Eastern “Amad."

Lest we forget, these are jazz musicians. Switch-hitting drummers Matt Wilson and Jeff Ballard exercise varying dynamics of rhythm and swing to keep the music light-hearted. William Schimmel’s accordian doubles as a piano, synthesizer, and string-section. He takes you easily from South America to Eastern Europe and of course New Orleans.

Wycliffe Gordon doubles on tuba and trombone, but his distinguished guttural plunger work threatens to steal the limelight here. He opens the title track with his shouting ‘bone followed by a melancholy ceremonial stroll with Nash’s clarinet. Both are joined by violinist Israeli-born Miri Ben-Ari to bring the music around to, perhaps Ireland(?). While they are at it, they take on Thelonious Monk’s “Bemsha Swing” with tenor/tuba/drums. It’s Monk straight out of a parade march, infectiously wry danceable music. It works, as does all the music on this fine recording.


Track Listing: Premiere Rhapsodie; Jump Line; Reverie; Tango Sierra; Sidewalk Meeting; Amad; Bemsha Swing; Summer Night In The Deep South; Sidewalk Meeting, Reprise.

Personnel: Ted Nash

Title: Sidewalk Meeting | Year Released: 2001 | Record Label: Arabesque Jazz

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Multiple Reviews
Album Reviews
Interviews
New York Beat
Album Reviews
Megaphone
Album Reviews
Multiple Reviews
Album Reviews
Read more articles
Presidential Suite (Eight Variations on Freedom)

Presidential Suite...

Motéma Music
2016

buy
Chakra

Chakra

Plastic Sax Records
2014

buy
Chakra

Chakra

Plastic Sax Records
2013

buy
The Creep

The Creep

Plastic Sax Records
2012

buy
The Mancini Project

The Mancini Project

Palmetto Records
2008

buy

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read Runner in the Rain Album Reviews
Runner in the Rain
By Jack Bowers
January 22, 2019
Read Driftglass Album Reviews
Driftglass
By Chris May
January 22, 2019
Read Pure Magic Album Reviews
Pure Magic
By Mark Sullivan
January 22, 2019
Read Vera Album Reviews
Vera
By Jerome Wilson
January 22, 2019
Read Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz Album Reviews
Kresten Osgood Quintet Plays Jazz
By Dan McClenaghan
January 21, 2019
Read The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two Album Reviews
The Poetry of Jazz Volume Two
By Victor L. Schermer
January 21, 2019
Read Mesophase Album Reviews
Mesophase
By Glenn Astarita
January 21, 2019