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ARTICLE: HI-RES JAZZ

Charles Mingus and Miles Davis: Changing Moods

Read "Charles Mingus and Miles Davis: Changing Moods" reviewed by Mark Werlin

The recordings of Charles Mingus in the mid-1950s document a musical voice so distinctive that they are immediately recognizable today. But Mingus' obsessive commitment to the primacy of the composition was not always shared by his peers, nor understood by his critics.

A public feud between Mingus, who was struggling unsuccessfully to win critical ...

Stephane Belmondo: The Same As It Never Was Before

Read "The Same As It Never Was Before" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

It is all a matter of the right tone for French trumpeter Stephane Belmondo. On Same As It Never Was Before, it is a matter of getting his lips in the right position--singular embouchure--then grabbing the air from his lungs and blowing it out in hot wild gusts through the horn. But it is also more ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

Diego Urcola Quartet: Appreciation

Read "Appreciation" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

Trumpeter Diego Urcola's is a voice that has remained somewhat hidden--certainly tucked away--for two decades in Paquito D'Rivera's quintet. And then there is the subdued role he has played in Guillermo Klein's fabulous larger ensemble, Los Guachos. However, the graceful candor of his voice is irrepressible, and it was only a matter of time before he ...

ARTICLE: CD/LP/TRACK REVIEW

James Zollar: Zollar System

Read "Zollar System" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

It is an unfortunate fact that trumpeter James Zollar is nowhere near as well-known as he should be. But that may be about to change. Zollar Systems may be about to put Zollar in an orbit all his own. A genuine renaissance man of the horn, Zollar is a singular voice on the instrument that is ...

Carol Morgan Trio: Opening

Read "Opening" reviewed by Raul d'Gama Rose

Opening is an album so rich in the intricacies of melody that it never fails to surprise at every turn. The saddest aspect of the album is that it is all too short. But the biggest surprise of all is Carol Morgan, a trumpeter who seems to have awakened the urge to find parallels in phrasing ...