461

Mysteries Of The Revolution: Mysteries Of The Revolution

Chris May By

Sign in to view read count
Mysteries Of The Revolution: Mysteries Of The Revolution
Composer/multi-instrumentalist BB Davis' London-based Red Orchidstra has been described as sounding like "Oscar Wilde on acid." Mysteries Of The Revolution, the keyboards-led power trio made up of the rhythmic core of the band, might similarly be described as "Arthur Rimbaud on a headful of the finest, hand pressed, Nepalese ganja." Not literally, for words play only cameo roles here, but in the passionate intensity of the music and its determination, in Rimbaud's words, to "disorder the senses."



Mysteries Of The Revolution will appeal to listeners who enjoyed having their brains fried by Mushroom's Joint Happening (Hyena Records, 2007), featuring the trumpeter Eddie Gale, or keyboard player Marco Benevento's Invisible Baby (Hyena Records, 2008), and who want the party to continue.



At the risk of over emphasising the Rimbaud resonances, but with the poet still in mind, the album's opening "Welcome," an ecstatic, chorale-led tumult, evokes in its crescendos composer Benjamin Britten's magical setting of Rimbaud's poetry, "Les Illuminations." Vocals play a part on two more tracks—Yussuf Ali guests on the Moroccan-inspired "Secret Fire" and Davis' own virtuosic beatvox on the vocalized-flute feature "Big Buddah," a shamanistic celebration of Rahsaan Roland Kirk. But elsewhere the arrangements are dominated by Davis' co-composer and multi-keyboardist, Dan Biro, on cranked-up, multi-layered Hammond, acoustic piano, Fender Rhodes and supporting cast of other keyboards.



MOTR cite the early-to-mid 1970s electric fusion of trumpeter Miles Davis, keyboard players Herbie Hancock and Joe Zawinul, and drummer Tony Williams as the core inspiration for Mysteries Of The Revolution, but the band achieve degrees of high-volume, full-on intensity here which those first-generation stylists attained only rarely. Only the dark, near-inchoate slabs of sound which Davis offered mid-decade come to mind.



The penultimate "Have You Seen Enough?" matches mid-1970s Davis at his most brooding and apocalyptic, and ends with an organ and percussion eruption which sounds, unmistakably, like a nuclear explosion heralding the end of the world. It's followed by "Evolution," a pretty, pastoral postscript replete with bird song and forest noises. It's a rare enigmatic moment closing an hour of otherwise mostly ferocious and intoxicating music.

Track Listing

Welcome; The Crunch; Storius Sensorius; The Elevation Of Mr Handy; Moonfrog's Tucker; Nico; Secret Fire; Romantica; Big Buddah; Have You Seen Enough?; Evolution.

Personnel

BB Davis: drums, flute, percussion, beatvox, vocals; Dan Biro: keyboards, electronica, vibraphonics; Mark Smith: electric bass; Yusuf "Squeeze Gut" Ali: vocals (7); Choir (1).

Album information

Title: Mysteries Of The Revolution | Year Released: 2008 | Record Label: Blue Serene Focus

Post a comment about this album

Tags

Shop Amazon

More

Read Data Lords
Data Lords
Maria Schneider Orchestra
Read Sleepy Town
Sleepy Town
Jamie Pregnell
Read Momento
Momento
Dave Milligan
Read Peace
Peace
Spirit Fingers
Read Warmer Than Blood
Warmer Than Blood
Chris Montague
Read Off Brand
Off Brand
Collage Project
Read Expanding Light
Expanding Light
Whit Dickey Trio
Read Iron Starlet
Iron Starlet
Connie Han

All About Jazz needs your support

Donate
All About Jazz & Jazz Near You were built to promote jazz music: both recorded and live events. We rely primarily on venues, festivals and musicians to promote their events through our platform. With club closures, shelter in place and an uncertain future, we've pivoted our platform to collect, promote and broadcast livestream concerts to support our jazz musician friends. This is a significant but neccesary effort that will help musicians now, and in the future. You can help offset the cost of this essential undertaking by making a donation today. In return, we'll deliver an ad-free experience (which includes hiding the bottom right video ad). Thank you.

Get more of a good thing

Our weekly newsletter highlights our top stories and includes your local jazz events calendar.