Dear All About Jazz Readers,

If you're familiar with All About Jazz, you know that we've dedicated over two decades to supporting jazz as an art form, and more importantly, the creative musicians who make it. Our enduring commitment has made All About Jazz one of the most culturally important websites of its kind in the world reaching hundreds of thousands of readers every month. However, to expand our offerings and develop new means to foster jazz discovery we need your help.

You can become a sustaining member for a modest $20 and in return, we'll immediately hide those pesky Google ads PLUS deliver exclusive content and provide access to future articles for a full year! This combination will not only improve your AAJ experience, it will allow us to continue to rigorously build on the great work we first started in 1995. Read on to view our project ideas...

41

Stefano Travaglini: Ellipse

Dan McClenaghan By

Sign in to view read count
Set up some studio time. Step into the studio. Sit down at the piano. Let your muse take you where she will. That's how pianist Stefano Travaglini rolled for the recording of Ellipse.

Solo jazz piano, free improvisation especially, has proven itself over the years a difficult artist endeavor. Consider the modern masters: Keith Jarrett, Matthew Shipp, Satoko Fujii, and the master of them all, Cecil Taylor—all players who have consistently excelled at the alone-with-the-piano mode of expression. What do they have in common? An ability to immerse themselves—body and soul—inside the vast possibilities of eighty-eight ivories, with the highest level of virtuosity and the knack for infusing their solo art with their own idiosyncratic personal essences.

Stefano Travaglini isn't, at this point in his journey, in a league with those genius-level players. But Ellipse says he may be on his way.

This hour-long rumination boasts deep roots in the European classical tradition, hints folk music perhaps, an introspective examination of jazz and certainly the essence of the musical persona of Travaglini himself.

The pianist has crafted a suite-like, hour-long celebration of the piano sound—introspective, searching, subtle in its joy, serious in its execution, and unfailingly beautiful, from the opener, the oddly titled and quizzical-sounding "The Importance of Fishing," through the majestic, un-Monkian-like "Monk's Mood—Presences," on to gorgeouly melancholy closer, Goodbye, for Now (Meditation).

A worthy entry into the solo piano genre of jazz.

Track Listing: The Importance of Fishing; Life; The Flowering Season; Persistence; Monk's Mood / Presences; Looking Back; Intermezzo; Softly, as in Morning Sunrise; Good Bye, for Now (Meditation).

Personnel: Stefano Travaglini: piano.

Title: Ellipse | Year Released: 2017 | Record Label: Notami Jazz

Tags

comments powered by Disqus

Album Reviews
Read more articles
Ellipse

Ellipse

Notami Jazz
2017

buy
The Hungarian Songbook

The Hungarian Songbook

Terre Sommerse
2013

buy

Shop

Start your shopping here and you'll support All About Jazz in the process. Learn how.

Related Articles

Read East Of The River Nile Album Reviews
East Of The River Nile
By Chris May
February 23, 2019
Read VOX Album Reviews
VOX
By Friedrich Kunzmann
February 23, 2019
Read live@ZKM Album Reviews
live@ZKM
By Bruce Lindsay
February 23, 2019
Read cinder: ember: ashes Album Reviews
cinder: ember: ashes
By Glenn Astarita
February 23, 2019
Read Amour Album Reviews
Amour
By Doug Collette
February 23, 2019
Read Friendly Signs Album Reviews
Friendly Signs
By Don Phipps
February 22, 2019
Read The Adventures of Mr Pottercakes Album Reviews
The Adventures of Mr Pottercakes
By Roger Farbey
February 22, 2019