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Jazz Articles about Jeff Rupert

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Album Review

The Flying Horse Big Band: A Message From The Flying Horse Big Band

Read "A Message From The Flying Horse Big Band" reviewed by Jack Bowers


The Message on the Florida-based Flying Horse Big Band's sixth album comes straight from the “messengers" themselves-- drummer Art Blakey's legendary Jazz Messengers, whose music is admirably presented here, and to whom the album is dedicated. Its ten songs were composed by members of the Jazz Messengers--Wayne Shorter, Hank Mobley, Horace Silver, Cedar Walton, Benny Golson--and two were re-scored for a large ensemble by former Messenger Michael Philip Mossman, with other charts by Mark Taylor (four), Harry ...

39
Album Review

The Jazz Professors: Blues and Cubes

Read "Blues and Cubes" reviewed by Jack Bowers


Yes, the Florida-based Jazz Professors, as befits the name, are smart—but don't let that throw you. They also swing in the best jazz tradition, even though their fourth album, Blues and Cubes, was inspired by the art of Pablo Picasso. Unlike Picasso's works, however, there is scant abstraction here; the Professors embody far more bop than bemusement, more Blue Note than bohemian. As for day gigs, the Professors maintain theirs at the University of Central Florida in ...

4
Album Review

Flying Horse Big Band: Florida Rays

Read "Florida Rays" reviewed by Jack Bowers


On its seventh recording, Florida Rays, the University of Central Florida's always dependable Flying Horse Big Band abandons its usual modus operandi—straight-from-the-hip contemporary jazz--to survey music associated with R&B legend (and Florida native) Ray Charles. As Charles, an accomplished musician, was best known as a vocalist, one might anticipate (correctly) that a handful of Charles' progeny would be stopping by to unmask their vocal talents. There are four singers in all: Rob Paparozzi, Vance Villastrigo, DaVonda Simmons and, last but ...

1
Radio & Podcasts

Jeff Rupert, Betty Carter, Gary Peacock and More

Read "Jeff Rupert, Betty Carter, Gary Peacock and More" reviewed by Joe Dimino


This week we focus on brand new material from artists that don't get the attention they deserve in the world of jazz. We begin with Jeff Rupert teamed up with the legendary George Garzone and make our way to trombonist Ryan Keberle. We profile new music from Polish saxophonist Sywester Ostrowski and Bobby Watson paying their respects to the Super Bowl 54 Champion Kansas City Chiefs. We pay homage to bassist Gary Peacock, who recently passed away at the age ...

7
Album Review

Jeff Rupert/George Garzone: The Ripple

Read "The Ripple" reviewed by Jim Worsley


The Ripple refers to the infectious, warm, intimate, yet big sound developed by the great Lester Young, starting in the late 1930s. While Young pioneered improvisational creativity, Stan Getz later took the baton (well, it was actually a saxophone) and further expanded his idol's stylish approach with new and creatively open-ended visions. Young and Getz collectively have had an enormous effect on future generations of sax players. Consequently, they have left a significant and impactful mark on the sound of ...

11
Album Review

The Flying Horse Big Band: The Bat Swings!

Read "The Bat Swings!" reviewed by Jack Bowers


Although The Bat Swings! could well be taken for a baseball analogy, the focus of this third CD by the University of Central Florida's high-powered Flying Horse Big Band is on music associated with the campy Batman TV series from the late 1960s that starred Adam West as the masked superhero and Burt Ward as his sidekick, Robin. The album embodies themes by the celebrated composers Nelson Riddle, Neal Hefti and Paul Francis Webster with arrangements by Michael Philip Mossman, ...

3
Album Review

Flying Horse Big Band: Big Man on Campus

Read "Big Man on Campus" reviewed by Jack Bowers


The Big Man on Campus on the fifth recording by the University of Central Florida's dexterous Flying Horse Big Band is composer / arranger / tenor saxophonist Harry Allen who wrote and arranged five of the album's eleven numbers and solos brightly on seven including Henry Mancini's amiable “Dreamsville," Billy Strayhorn's happy-go-lucky “Raincheck" and Antonio Carlos Jobim's amorous “Triste." The band's music director, Jeff Rupert, composed and arranged the shuffling “B.M.O.C." and picturesque “New Creole Love Call," ...


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