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Jazz Articles about Dave Burrell

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Liner Notes

Marion Brown: Three For Shepp To Gesprachsfetzen Revisited

Read "Marion Brown: Three For Shepp To Gesprachsfetzen Revisited" reviewed by Chris May


"It is often those we hear the least that we should listen to the most." So wrote the Guadeloupean pianist Jonathan Jurion on the release of his album Le Temps Fou: The Music Of Marion Brown (Komos, 2019). Just why Marion Brown has become such a rarely acknowledged figure is unclear. He possessed all the qualifications needed to go large plus a few extras for good measure. He was a good-looking man. He dressed well (telling Dave ...

Album Review

Clifford Thornton: Ketchaoua Revisited + Arthur Jones Trio: Scorpio

Read "Ketchaoua Revisited + Arthur Jones Trio: Scorpio" reviewed by Alberto Bazzurro


Clifford Thornton è una di quelle figure rimaste fin troppo fra le pieghe della mitologia (sia detto ovviamente senza alcun intento ironico) free, e più ancora il pressoché sconosciuto altosassofonista Arthur Jones, l'uno nato a Philadelphia nel 1936 e scomparso nel 1989, l'altro nato a Cleveland nel 1940 e morto nel 1998. Questa preziosa ristampa, che allinea i dischi d'esordio in proprio di entrambi, editi a suo tempo dalla leggendaria Byg Actuel, l'uno, Ketchaoua, nel 1969, l'altro, Scorpio, due anni ...

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Album Review

Dave Burrell: Harlem Rhapsody

Read "Harlem Rhapsody" reviewed by Mark Corroto


It would be an error to characterize pianist Dave Burrell as a witness to history. Avant-garde jazz history that is. The octogenarian was heard in the 1960s groups of Marion Brown, Pharoah Sanders, Noah Howard, Archie Shepp, Sonny Sharrock, Sunny Murray, and Grachan Moncur III, while also exchanging ideas in New York with Albert Ayler, Sam Rivers, and Tony Williams. Burrell is not just a witness; he is the embodiment of jazz history. In the 1990s, together with David Murray, ...

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Album Review

Noah Howard: Quartet To At Judson Hall, Revisited

Read "Quartet To At Judson Hall, Revisited" reviewed by Mark Corroto


Saxophonist Noah Howard is a musician deserving wider recognition. Born in New Orleans in 1943, like many black musicians he began playing music in the church. After a stint in the army, he settled on the West Coast where the avant-garde was progressing outside the purview of New York, which at the time was considered the center of all things jazz. The West Coast was also the origin of such as avant-gardists as Ornette Coleman, Don Cherry, Charlie Haden, and ...

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Album Review

Ivo Perelman - Dave Burell - Bobby Kapp: Trichotomy

Read "Trichotomy" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian


Intrepid saxophonist Ivo Perelman is a master improviser who has the knack of engaging others of a similar mindset to create provocative music. On his third release of 2023, the stimulating Trichotomy, he joins forces with the equally innovative pianist Dave Burrell with whom he recorded a duo session a few years back. Versatile drummer Bobby Kapp, another idiosyncratic artist, completes the trio which stretches out on two long, dynamic, multilayered pieces. “Part One" starts off with a ...

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Extended Analysis

Brass And Ivory Tales

Read "Brass And Ivory Tales" reviewed by Hrayr Attarian


Innovative saxophonist Ivo Perelman celebrates his 60th birthday with the release of a magnum opus, Brass And Ivory Tales. Recorded over a period of seven years, this nine-volume box set is impressive in both its depth and breath as it matches Perelman with a different piano master per disc. The improvised duets are usually the first documented meeting between the two musicians and the instant and rapidly evolving synergy is fresh and thrilling. Both remarkable and expected is Perelman's ability ...

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Album Review

Ivo Perelman: Brass And Ivory Tales

Read "Brass And Ivory Tales" reviewed by Mark Corroto


Archeologists and cultural anthropologists theorize early humans had some form of music appreciation. They listened to the sounds wind made as it passed through trees. The breeze sounded different passing through oak than it did fir trees, and the sound was altered whether it was spring or fall. Then there were the bird songs, the first Lennon & McCartneys of the stone age. Early man replicated these melodies, with bones that could be whittled into horns or used to recreate ...


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