Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page.

6

Reassessing

Piano

Read "Piano" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


Following his debut as a leader on, Wynton Kelly: New Faces -New Sounds (Blue Note, 1951), pianist Kelly surfaced again some seven years later, this time on Riverside Records, with the simply titled Piano. The length of time between leader recordings is a testament to the pianist's value in a supporting role for artists like Dinah Washington (with whom he recorded almost exclusively between 1952 and 1955) Lester Young, and Dizzy Gillespie. During this same period Kelly contributed to several ...

11

Reassessing

Full House

Read "Full House" reviewed by C. Michael Bailey


Wes Montgomery's recording of his June 25, 1962 live performance at the Tsubo Jazz Club in Berkeley, California intersects significantly with two recent Resonance releases. One intersection involves the Wynton Kelly trio, comprised of pianist Kelly, bassist Paul Chambers, and drummer Jimmy Cobb. It was with this same trio that Montgomery would record his essential Wynton Kelly Trio with Wes Montgomery: Smokin' at the Half Note (Verve, 1965) and then, later, be captured with on Smokin' in Seattle: Live At ...

21

Album Review

Meade Lux Lewis: The Blues Piano Artistry of Meade Lux Lewis

Read "The Blues Piano Artistry of Meade Lux Lewis" reviewed by Marc Davis


In three decades of professional writing, I don't think I've ever used the word “twee." But I'm about to. Look it up. Dictionary.com says “twee" means “affectedly dainty or quaint." Put another way: Unnaturally cute. That's the celeste in jazz. It's cute and dainty and thoroughly unnatural. What's more, it's a mood killer. I can't understand why anyone would use it. You've heard the celeste, even if you don't know it. It sounds like ...

427

Album Review

Wes Montgomery: The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery

Read "The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery" reviewed by Chris May


Ask a dozen jazz guitar fans for their all-time top guitar albums and The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery is likely to be high on every list. If it isn't, chances are Montgomery's live set Full House (Riverside, 1962), recorded two years later, will be. With these discs, Indianapolis-born Montgomery (1923-68) gave the guitar its biggest quantum leaps forward, both stylistically and in terms of listener acceptance, since Charlie Christian in the late 1930s/early 1940s and Johnny Smith in ...

404

Album Review

Cannonball Adderley: The Cannonball Adderley Sextet in New York

Read "The Cannonball Adderley Sextet in New York" reviewed by Samuel Chell


Jazz musicians are antisocial when measured by the public's standards. Tell someone you're a musician, and the response is: “What's the name of your group?" Truth of the matter is that, the MJQ and Art Blakey notwithstanding, group identity seems an ill fit with the music's emphasis on individual expression. For this reason, it's all too easy to dismiss the dates featuring the Adderley Brothers' Group as grooving and highly communicative, but lacking in substance compared to the sessions exclusively ...

395

Album Review

Jimmy Heath Orchestra: Really Big!

Read "Really Big!" reviewed by Joel Roberts


The ten-piece band on this invigorating 1960 Riverside release by Jimmy Heath wasn't “really big, but the talent level of the artists certainly was. How about Clark Terry on trumpet, Nat Adderley on cornet, brother Cannonball on alto sax and either Tommy Flanagan or Cedar Walton on piano? Plus, all three Heath brothers (Jimmy on tenor sax, Percy on bass and Tootie on drums) recording together for one of the first times ever on Jimmy's second date as a leader ...

434

Album Review

George Russell Sextet: Ezz-Thetics

Read "Ezz-Thetics" reviewed by Troy Collins


A post-war masterpiece, Ezz-Thetics is pianist/arranger George Russell's definitive 1961 sextet recording from the earliest phase of his multi-decade career. On par with such iconic albums as Oliver Nelson's Blues and the Abstract Truth (Impulse!, 1961), Mal Waldron's The Quest (Riverside, 1961) and Andrew Hill's Point of Departure (Blue Note, 1964), Ezz-Thetics traffics in the same advanced but accessible strain of avant-garde-influenced post-bop.

Author of The Lydian Chromatic Concept of Tonal Organization (pub. 1953), Russell's seminal concepts of ...


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