Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page.

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Album Review

Binker & Moses: Feed Infinite

Read "Feed Infinite" reviewed by Chris May


For a nutritious seasonal feast, forget the Holiday dreck that swamps the jazz world every December and instead get your gnashers round London-based semi-free duo Binker & Moses' single “Feed Infinite." Having released four outstanding albums (two studio and two live) since 2015, tenor saxophonist Binker Golding and drummer Moses Boyd have been looking to tweak their paradigm and “Feed Infinite" maps out a possible new trajectory. The track retains the duo's raw, romping, in-the-moment, acoustic visceralism ...

6

Album Review

Abdullah Ibrahim: Solotude

Read "Solotude" reviewed by Gareth Thompson


Abdullah Ibrahim once told a seminar at his M7 Academy in Cape Town, “The devil lives on the stage. This is where the ego comes out." On the strength of Solotude, recorded live on his eighty-sixth birthday, Ibrahim has crushed such personal demons and now lets angels guide his performing. One takes his point though, given that even the most spiritual music needs some sense of conceit to create and promote it. But this is an artist with nothing left ...

3

Album Review

Graham Costello's Strata: Second Lives

Read "Second Lives" reviewed by Gareth Thompson


A top German physiologist once compared the brain's nerve fibres to a piano's keys, on which our thoughts play or strike. Scottish drummer and composer Graham Costello might relate to this, given how well he writes for the piano, as he explores themes of mental challenges on this second album with his excellent band Strata. How we face inner hurdles to reach the other side preoccupies Costello here, though he also toys with notions of heritage and identity. ...

10

Album Review

Binker and Moses: Escape The Flames

Read "Escape The Flames" reviewed by Chris May


The audio equivalent of a novel by Neil Gaiman, tenor saxophonist Binker Golding and drummer Moses Boyd's semi-free duo Binker and Moses is still, five years after its launch in 2015, the most fantastical sound to come out of London's alternative jazz scene. Packed with as many thrills and spills and steam-punk magick spells as, say, Gaiman's London-set Neverwhere, Binker and Moses is a similarly unputdownable page-turner--but unlike Gaiman, Golding and Boyd are prepared, thank God, to release sequels.

8

Album Review

Alan Wakeman: The Octet Broadcasts 1969 and 1979

Read "The Octet Broadcasts 1969 and 1979" reviewed by Chris May


Despite a perception fostered by the more breathless media coverage given to the young lions who have emerged on the London scene since the mid 2010s, an identifiably British strand of jazz did not kick off when Shabaka Hutchings' Sons Of Kemet released its debut album in 2013. The groundwork was laid back in the 1950s by musicians such as saxophonist Joe Harriott and pianist Stan Tracey. In the 1970s, two bandleaders who carried the torch for ...

21

Album Review

Charles Tolliver: Connect

Read "Connect" reviewed by Chris May


Put out more flags. Connect, the first release from trumpeter Charles Tolliver in over a decade, is a monster. From the Saturday-night goodtime opener “Blue Soul" through to the intense, Spanish tinged, serpentine closer “Suspicion," the album finds Tolliver still at the top of his game in a recording career which began in the mid 1960s. He fronts a US quintet which brings with it the grit and groove of a mid-1960s Blue Note hard-bop band while sounding totally 2020. ...

10

Album Review

Thiago Nassif: Mente

Read "Mente" reviewed by Chris May


This is by no stretch of the imagination a jazz album, yet Brazilian singer, multi-instrumentalist and composer Thiago Nassif's Mente is so packed with risk-taking and invention that it is likely to appeal to a good number of AAJers. The music's starting point is tropicalia, Brazil's tripped-out successor to bossa nova in the mid to late 1960s. The wider tropicalia movement--a southern hemisphere cousin of contemporary Left Bank Paris and Downtown New York countercultures—was a multi-media phenomenon ...


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