Jazz Articles

Daily articles including interviews, profiles, live reviews, film reviews and more... all carefully curated by the All About Jazz staff. You can find more articles by searching our website, see what's trending on our popular articles page or read articles ahead of their published dates on our future articles page. Read our daily album reviews.

153

Album Review

Chris Connor: Chris Connor Sings Gentle Bossa Nova

Read "Chris Connor Sings Gentle Bossa Nova" reviewed by David Rickert


If you were a jazz singer in the mid-sixties, chances are you recorded a bossa nova album. It might have been great, it might have been terrible, but it most likely fell somewhere in-between. You may not have wanted to record one, but bossa nova was too popular a fad to resist, and not many people were buying jazz records anyway. And, at least, bossa nova records allowed you the opportunity to use your jazz chops on something deliberately commercial.

252

Album Review

John Patton: Soul Connection

Read "Soul Connection" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza


The Hammond B-3 soul-jazz sound of Big John Patton (as he was then called) was perfect for the 1960s. It was the groove that drew attention and Patton made several albums for Blue Note. As his style went out of favor, some of the recordings never saw the light of day until almost 20 years later and at the same time Patton slipped into the background. He resurfaced in the 1980s and went into the studio. Among his albums Soul ...

315

Album Review

Alvin Queen: Jammin' Uptown

Read "Jammin' Uptown" reviewed by Jerry D'Souza


Back in 1985, drummer Alvin Queen put together a band of American musicians to record Jammin' Uptown for his Nilva Records label. Queen, who was living in Europe, visited the United States to play live concerts and to record. This band reflected his vision as he brought together young musicians Terence Blanchard (trumpet) and Robin Eubanks (trombone) along with veterans John Hicks (piano) and Manny Boyd (tenor, alto and soprano sax) with Ray Drummond (bass) as the bridge. ...

165

Album Review

Trudy Desmond: A Dream Come True

Read "A Dream Come True" reviewed by Jim Santella


Trudy Desmond made four studio recordings in her lifetime. Cancer took the vocalist from us all too soon. She could interpret a song convincingly, and she always gave us a warm musical performance. This compilation gives us the best of Trudy Desmond through excerpts from RSVP (1988), Tailor Made (1991), Make Me Rainbows (1995), and My One and Only (1998).

Her clear vocal delivery makes each song come to life. Desmond is accompanied by great friends, and her ...

384

Album Review

Nina Simone: Let It Be Me

Read "Let It Be Me" reviewed by Jim Santella


Recorded in 1980 at a Quebec concert performance before thousands of adoring fans at Salle Wilfrid-Pelletier of Place des Arts in Montreal, this just-reissued 33-minute album provides a personal glimpse of the persona that Nina Simone brought us.

The concert is unique. Simone performs some of the material alone, involves the audience on occasion, and works with bass and drums for a portion. Her audience rapport works well, since she talks to them in English and French. Informal ...

452

Album Review

Dizzy Gillespie: Salt Peanuts

Read "Salt Peanuts" reviewed by Terrell Kent Holmes


Ted Williams could go one for four. Maria Callas wasn't always in perfect voice. Words sometimes failed Hemingway. Even legends have normal days. Salt Peanuts is a recently discovered recording of a Dizzy Gillespie concert date in Montréal in 1981 and although his playing was still strong, it frankly isn't one of his better moments. Gillespie fires off a few of his trademark lightning riffs on “On Green Dolphin Street, with flutist Sayyd Abdul Al-Khabyyr kicking in a ...

555

Album Review

Dizzy Gillespie: Salt Peanuts

Read "Salt Peanuts" reviewed by Trevor MacLaren


Salt Peanuts is a Dizzy Gillespie show recorded in July 1981 at The Rising Sun Celebrity Jazz Club in Montreal. Though Dizzy's work from the '70s on is patchy at best, this show is a real killer. It seemed Gillespie and his crew were really into a groove while hanging out in Canada's jazz Mecca.

The disc opens on a weak note with “On Green Dolphin Street." The solos have their moments, but nowhere within the track is the melody. ...


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